Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:51 pm

Facebook Friend Carmen Matthews writes:

“He would not be pleased by those who have turned that movement from something good to something that goes against his mission.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:53 pm

ABQ Journal Reader u Gould writes:

“Not entirely sure BLM is one cohesive organization, so I withheld comment. But then someone claiming to be from Black Lives matter gave an interview and tried (poorly) to explain that it was meant “playfully,” they lost me entirely. *Even if this was true,* it is offensive and incredibly stupid. If you’re trying to get more people on your side.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:53 pm

ABQ Journal Reader Rudi Cruz writes:

” You are a clueless racist who needs to stop trying to tell black people what MLK would think or say about anything. You are seriously embarrassing yourself. This kind of racist stupidity doesn’t deserve any further response.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:54 pm

Dear Mr. Cruz,

Yet you did respond. Interesting.

Gee, no one has ever called me racist before, Mr. Cruz. I wish you’d given me specifics about why you believe that.
And, as for embarrassing one’s self? I have never interrupted a candidate’s speech, chanted ugly, hateful things about police or denied the idea that EVERY life matters. With that in mind, you may want to reconsider who is acting in an embarrassing fashion. ~ DD

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:56 pm

Noozhawk Reader Onceler’s Revenge writes:

” King was well educated, smart and a great writer/orator. I was assigned his ‘Letter From Birmingham Jail’ as both an undergraduate and graduate student. These kids nowadays are alarmingly uneducated, poorly spoken and often bordering on illiterate. Their community leaders and the media in all it’s various forms have failed them terribly. King would probably start crying if he could see today’s situation.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 2:58 pm

Noozhawk Reader James GD writes:

“what an ignorant article.
heres an actual quote from mlk:
“I contend that the cry of “black power” is, at bottom, a reaction to the reluctance of white power to make the kind of changes necessary to make justice a reality for the Negro. I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard.”
never mind “black lives matter,” mlk defended “black power,” and he rationalized rioting. the black rights activists of today are tame in comparison to some of mlk’s contemporaries. diane doesnt know what mlks opinions were, and its foolish of her to suggest she knows more about the civil rights era than the kids shes criticizing; they have the benefit of first-hand accounts from family members who lived the history she only read about.
and “fry ’em” is not street talk for anything. its more likely a reference to the death penalty (i.e., the electric chair) for the crime of murder (e.g., of unarmed black people). sadly, its not even accurate to say “black men” because unarmed black women and children have also been killed by police with impunity.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:00 pm

Noozhawk Reader kevmo replies to JamesGD:

” I must respectfully disagree. You’re quite wrong to call this article ignorant. Lacking depth and nuance yes, but ignorant no. However, I am often wearied by the prevailing canned perception of Rev. MLK Jr., as people presume to know all there is to know, or all they need to know, about him based on, what has been reduced to, a sound bite from one sentence, from one speech. Unfortunately, also for the sake of historical expediency the rich legacy of the movement and Rev. King has been reduced to the narrative of nonviolence, which itself a travesty of history.
To the point, there was no love lost between Rev. Dr. King and the black power movement (BPM) led by Stokely Carmichael a former leader within the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) – noted for the lunch counter sit-ins, and the freedom riders. By ’64/’65 Carmichael and other former SNCC members became disenchanted with the nonviolent methods championed by Rev. King and they grew impatient with the progress of the Southern Christian Leadership Council (SCLC) led by Rev. King and leading black ministers. Even though Rev. King and most SCLC leaders were 30 somethings themselves, the fiery rhetoric of Carmichael successfully, much to Rev. King’s chagrin, tarred him and the SCLC as part of the black accommodationist past who were actually hindering black progress.
Carmichael and the new BPM, influenced by the philosophy of a radical and militant form of Black Nationalism and economic socialism of Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and to a lesser extent DuBoise, also advocated violence that Rev. King vehemently opposed as a matter of principle, and which he also believed to be foolhardy, counterproductive and pointless.
Nevertheless Carmichael’s message loudly resonated with the young people and permanently split the movement, and from that point on Rev. King and the SCLC remained on the defensive and always playing catch up.
So, the passage you quote, and any other such remarks made by Rev. King were never defenses, rationalizations or justifications of or for the Black Power movement, but rather were explanations acknowledging the BPM but usually in an effort to win them back to his viewpoint, or to at least moderate the violent aspects of the BPM.
While the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., would likely have articulated the sentiment animating the Black Lives Matter movement, there is absolutely no doubt at all he would have resoundingly condemned it as a violation of the principles of nonviolence for which he would eventually lose his life.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:02 pm

Noozhawk Reader AN50 replies to kevmo:

“Thank you Kevmo for articulating yet another well thought out response, which I happen to agree with. All too often we find responses in the bloggosphere to be bereft of any deep thinking. Sadly I must say, many of mine fall into that category. Thank you for showing us that a response can be intelligent, well thought out and informative without any derogatory language. You continue to be one of my greatest inspirations here, please keep writing.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:05 pm

Noozhawk Reader kevmo replies to AN50:

“AN50, I’m humbled by your gracious remarks. I personally endeavor to raise the level of discourse on the forums where I decide to engage and hopefully promote a balanced Constitutionally conservative life affirming perspective and I appreciate your acknowledgment of that effort. Thanks Again!
All The Best to You!
PS My wife asked me if I wrote this myself. :-)”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:43 pm

Noozhawk Reader JamesGD replies to kevmo:

“the exchange you cite was blm confronting and questioning hilary; they werent there to explain themselves to her. given that context, your inference about what theyre unable to articulate is a non sequitur. blm’s end-game is called “campaign zero.” there is no blood on blm’s hands. whether you find them credible is of no consequence, kevmo. their movement has taken off. the ship has sailed.”

And, Kevmo replies (lastly) to JamesGD

“Referring to the exchange as a “hallway discussion” was my polite way of saying it was an informal impromptu encounter, but your accurate characterization as a confrontation underscores the author’s assertion that BLMs tactics encourages militancy and ultimately inspires violent vigilantism.

That aside, when HRC pressed the BLM reps for specifics, if BLM were serious they would have at least had their elevator pitch ready, described the problem and provided solutions. Instead BLM engaged in more pointless argumentative lecturing, which is a sure sign BLM lacks direction, purpose and meaning.

As an African-American father of two young black men (a high schooler and a collegian), no one and I mean no one, is more keenly aware of the deadly default racist hair trigger attitudes of an excruciatingly small percentage some police have towards black men – as all it takes is encountering that one bad apple. However, I’ve also lived long enough and have experienced enough of life to also know with equal certainty that BLM is not the solution.

Lastly I’m not so presumptuous as to believe my opinion has any bearing whatsoever on BLMs activities. Also BLM is doing a good job of discrediting itself without my help. However there is one thing we both agree on, and that is the BLM ship has sailed, but as I see it the BLM ship is rudderless, full of holes, and will soon go the way of the Occupy movement.

You take care.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:18 pm

Facebook Friend Lisa Wolfe writes:

“He would be appalled at how this country is ran, how the President of Our country has taken God out of it and planted so much hatred, fear, lies into our people.. How our Own in Blue are being senselessly murdered because they up hold the law.. He would be saddened that God’s laws are no longer acceptable, but the gay and lesbian’s are welcomed to marry and have the same rights as Man/ Woman… That the ILLEGAL immigrants SNEAKING into OUR country have more rights that an AMERICAN Citizen have, Martin Luther Jr. Would be appalled that a 65 year old MAN that wants to be a woman can be glorified and awarded the ESPY instead of a Veteran that has served OUR country and put their life on the line for us… I could go on and on, but what good does it do.. If any one knows the Bible, they know how it ends and GOD will return, one day soon and we will ALL answer for what we did or didn’t do, and for those of us that are saved and believe, Well,we will be walking the streets of Gold, while those that turned their backs, laughed, blasphemed,disobeyed God,will remain in the Godless world and wish they would’ve followed God’s word instead of this world…”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:19 pm

Facebook Friend William Drummond writes:

“The question is, matter to whom?”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:20 pm

Facebook Friend Lynne Adrine writes:

“This post is so misinformed that I don’t know where to begin. If you have read a sampling of Dr. King’s work — beyond the often-posted small segment of his March on Washington speech — you would see that he was an activist of social justice, especially for those who so often had suffered mistreatment by those government organizations that their tax dollars paid to support. The most recent government statistics show there have been FEWER attacks on police officers this year. And as for the obnoxious chats of some protesters in Minnesota, they no more represent all of “Black Lives Matter” than Dylan Roof represents all South Carolina gun owners. Before you claim to know what Dr. King would “think,’ I suggest you read more of his writings.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:39 pm

Dear Lynne:

First, no one denies MLK was an “activist of social justice.” Of course he was. In my opinion he was also courageous, prescient and a martyr to his cause.

What he was NOT was an in-your-face, hateful invective spewing loudmouth who refused to acknowledge the rights and needs of others. The very core of Dr. King’s success was his ability to hone his laser-focused intensity toward changing the world in a determined, calm and respectful way. And he succeeded using this strategy.

In his day – and yes, I’m old enough to remember – Martin Luther King, Jr. made the world hear HIS message that “Black Lives Matter”. But he didn’t go about it in the ugly, shameful (in my opinion) way today’s Black Lives Matter group conducts itself.

Therein lies the difference, Lynne, that I was highlighting in this column.
To your other points: >>> “And as for the obnoxious chats (sic) of some protesters in Minnesota, they no more represent all of “Black Lives Matter” than Dylan Roof represents all South Carolina gun owners.”>>>

Okay, then why didn’t Black Lives Matter representatives who I saw interviewed on both CNN and MSNBC denounce their chants about “pigs” and “fryin’ ’em?” In all instances where BLM reps were given the opportunity to explain they, instead, tried to explain it away. If you don’t denounce racism you condone it, right, Lynne? Isn’t it the same with those who call for killing cops?
Yes, there have been A FEW fewer attacks on police officers so far this year – but you must admit that the uptick lately, the increased number of police officers being ambushed and shot to death is disturbing. Or maybe you don’t think that. But I do.

Finally, I never claimed to know what “Dr. King would think” in this piece….but I did opine that he might be “rolling in his grave”…a colloquial term I’m sure you’ve heard. And note that many of my readers who commented here agree with me that Dr. King, were he alive today, would in the words of one, “probably start crying if he could see today’s situation.” ~ DD

mplo February 4, 2016 at 10:23 am

Martin Luther King Jr. wanted a truly different kind of society. Unfortunately, he didn’t have the chance to really even try to implement his agenda, because he was cruelly gunned down.

Had MLK Jr. lived, things would’ve more than likely been very different today.

Diane Dimond February 4, 2016 at 10:35 am

I completely agree! I wish MLK was still with us or had lived much longer…long enough to spawn other sincere and focused civil rights leadership. Not the self-aggrandizing types like Al Sharpton who preach “victimhood” but the type of leader who stresses self confidence, self reliance, higher education and dignity. -DD

mplo February 4, 2016 at 11:26 am

Thanks for a good post with points well taken, Diane Dimond. This may be a bit off topic, but had it not been for the fact that guns are so accessible (in fact, they’re far too accessible!) here in the United States, MLK Jr. would invariably be alive, or he would’ve lived longer.

I’m old enough to remember a lot of what went on back then, and an attempt was made on his life, shortly before he was gunned down. When MLK Jr. went into a meat market in the Roxbury section of Boston one morning, a crazed black woman stabbed him in the chest with a butcher knife, which just missed his heart by a rather small fraction of an inch. MLK Jr. was taken to Mass. General Hospital Emergency room, where he was warned to keep perfectly still and not move. He got the emergency care that he needed, which saved his life.

Yes, you’re right that MLK Jr. was very dignified. Thanks again for your great post.

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 3:52 pm

Facebook Friend Ashley D.writes:

“Diane, straight talk and no political correct bias in your latest piece “What Would Martin Luther King Say About Black Lives Matter.”

In this country today, there is a fight to control language. The manipulative usage of the phrase “Black Lives Matter” suggests that it (black lives) don’t matter. If this latest political movement were honest, they would address the real problem : black on black crime.

If MLK Jr. were alive today and saw that America had elected it’s first black president, that people of African American heritage enjoy the best living of any place in the world, he (MLK Jr.) would be amazed.

That’s one of many things I like about your reports, you speak you mind- the truth. No political correctness with you! I agree wholeheartedly that Michael Brown instigated his own demise, and race hustlers used that event to create a red herring. Good job Diane!”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 5:36 pm

Twitter Pal starknightz writes:

“@DiDimond heard one of the Black Lives Matter speakers say Martin Luther King’s way didn’t work so they are doing things differently. smh”

Roni September 7, 2015 at 8:02 pm

Thank you for your well-written piece, Diane. I take issue with certain aspects of it, however, and will fully disclose that I do not come close to anything approaching your conclusions about Dr. King’s opinion on violent behavior and rhetoric, his postmortem body movements or condemnation of the social movement, Black Lives Matter.

BLM is in its toddler-hood as a social movement, barely two years old, and conceived in an impulsive reaction to the perceived (and I would argue, real) injustice following the verdict in the Trayvon Martin shooting death. As a toddler it will have growing pains, some of them serious. However, the very rate of growth of the movement itself speaks to the body of support behind it.

Dr. King was fully aware of the origins of the kind of violence that seeps into these movements in their infancy. He was also fully aware of the tendency to conflate the actions of ‘some’ with the motivation and intentions of ‘all’. His own non-violent movement was racked with accusation and innuendo when in began and there were those within his movement who sought more violent ways of dealing with oppression.

In “The Other America”, a speech given at Stanford University in 1967, MLK speaks to the urban and social blight that inflicts our land of milk and honey, that infects it with a desperation and feeling of marginalization so deep that the urge for violent reaction is, if not desired, at least understandable. He was speaking, of course, of the heinously and racially segregated state of our nation. His topic may have been primarily economic in nature, but his words were global in application. He states:

“This is the tragedy of racism because its ultimate logic is genocide. If one says that I am not good enough to live next door to him, if one says that I am not good enough to eat at at a lunch counter, or to have a good, decent job, or to go to school with him merely because of my race, he is saying consciously or unconsciously that I do not deserve to exist.”

To paraphrase Dr. King, the echoing refrain is, to the racist, that black lives do not matter.

Dr. King, also in the Stanford speech, states clearly that he understands the tendency toward violence that such marginalization and desperation may give rise to – that “our cities are potentially powder kegs”. While continuing to condemn violence as a means to obtain civil rights, he certainly understood it, understood that it does not “develop out of thin air”, and that such is the “language of the unheard.”

That we still, nearly fifty years after the assassination of Dr. King, use the stilted rhetoric of white privilege, to speak ‘reason’ to the black man or woman, is deplorable. That one would invoke Dr. King’s name in order to do so is illogical… and simply sad. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. understood the arbitrary sociopolitical demarcation line between the races, understood that in this society black lives did not matter in the same way that ‘all lives’ matter, understood that to promote the former was not a dismissal of the latter. To state otherwise, implicitly or explicitly, is disingenuous at best.

So, no, I don’t think Dr. King is rolling over in his grave because of Black Lives Matter and the small faction within or without that movement that takes up violent measures. He would condemn their violent actions and rhetoric, yes. But he would understand them. It is much more likely that Dr. King is shaking his head and weeping that, nearly five decades after James Earl Ray decided that King’s own black life did not matter, we are still so deeply engaged in the battle.

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 9:13 pm

Facebook Friend Latrice Goodman writes:

“he would say all lives matter he did not just fight for black lives he fought for every race and color to be treated equally for everyone to be treated fair but yet u look at the world and u would never know equality exist lets not forget he had a dream for everybody to join together not to break each other down.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 9:14 pm

Facebook Friend Barbara Riddle-Dvorak writes:

“Isn’t the point that “white lives matter most” has been the default position in America since it was founded (ask the Native Americans) and we need a major correction back to “all lives matter equally”? How we can get there is a huge challenge but no one could possibly argue that we are in balance now, could they? Black Lives Matter to me is a needed statement that brings the topic out of the shadows. In no way does it imply that white lives don’t matter too. Everybody already assumes that.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 9:15 pm

Yes, Barbara I think that has been the default position in America for a long time. But I do think things are getting better if you look at it from a historical perspective.
Better today for blacks in America than during the Civil War, better for blacks now then during World War 1 or World War 2 times, certainly better for blacks since the Civil Rights Act was passed and, many would argue it’s better in America now for blacks since Barack Obama has been president….as well as other minorities.
I agree with you there is still work to be done and we need to be able to discuss this topic in a calm, reasonable and respectful way. I thank you for writing.”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 9:16 pm

Facebook Friend Andrea Saint James writes:

“I wonder what he would have to say about Ben Carson?”

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 10:53 pm

Facebook Friend David Mapp writes:

“Sigh. Doctor King lead matches related to ensuring that Blacks had the right to vote: Black Votes Matter. He lead marches and the Montgomery Bus Boycott so that Blacks could sit in any seat on a bus and not have to give up a seat just because A White person got on the bus: Black Dignity Matters. And, Dr. King recognized that Blacks were not safe in the Country and that the law did not protect them. In speaking out against the Vietnam War, King said, “We arm Negro soldiers to kill on foreign battlefields but offer little protection for their relatives from beatings and killings in our own South… ” Now, honestly, what do you think that means? What’s left? Some people who are part of the movement endorse violence as a catalyst for change. King would not agree with them as he did not agree with Malcolm X, Medgar Evers or the Black Panthers. He said there should be no violence. But every step he marched meant Black Lives Matter.”

Arthur Kramer I would like to give qualified approval to Diane’s point because it is the goal that Dr. King set for the “promised land”. All lives mattering was his dream, regardless of race. So my only difference is in the justification for a midcourse correction or a question about how far we have come. In the first 50 years of last century, black lives did not matter. Then the Civil Rights movement developed momentum, with Dr. King’s example and a lot of black and white citizen support in different proportions but from all over the country. Racism and hatred is like a metastesized cancer that needs to be excised but watched to see if it comes back. It is not an appendix you can simply remove. So, even after a visibly African-American is elected President, there is still only one black senator despite larger representation in many other parts of the government, a lot of black sheriffs but only one black Governor (scratch that, Duval Patrick is out of office). So when we start seeing headlines about unarmed black men being killed not just by George Zimmerman but by police using more force than would seem necessary, it is not inappropriate to ask if we are losing some of the progress we had made. It is a question that was framed as a comment “Black Lives Matter” meaning “too” or “as much” as white lives. That was prompted by a growing perception that, once again, they didn’t matter as much because care was not being taken to preserve them when choices were being made. As I criticize Trump, so I criticize those who claim affiliation with the official “Black Lives Matter” movement for using anger as policy. Harassing Bernie Sanders just made them look stupid, picking on a friend who already understood and was sympathetic to their cause. Although the “All Lives Matter” backlash is often well intended, particularly as we are losing white and black police officers to killers, much of the backlash has been coming from those who did not vote for Obama and who never considered voting for him because electing him was “going too far”. That is the crowd who “want our country back” where just being white made you feel a little better even if you were trailer park trash, like before the Civil Rights movement took hold, back when black lives did not matter.

Diane Dimond September 7, 2015 at 10:55 pm

Facebook Friend Arthur Kramer writes:

“I would like to give qualified approval to Diane’s point because it is the goal that Dr. King set for the “promised land”. All lives mattering was his dream, regardless of race. So my only difference is in the justification for a midcourse correction or a question about how far we have come. In the first 50 years of last century, black lives did not matter. Then the Civil Rights movement developed momentum, with Dr. King’s example and a lot of black and white citizen support in different proportions but from all over the country. Racism and hatred is like a metastesized cancer that needs to be excised but watched to see if it comes back. It is not an appendix you can simply remove. So, even after a visibly African-American is elected President, there is still only one black senator despite larger representation in many other parts of the government, a lot of black sheriffs but only one black Governor (scratch that, Duval Patrick is out of office). So when we start seeing headlines about unarmed black men being killed not just by George Zimmerman but by police using more force than would seem necessary, it is not inappropriate to ask if we are losing some of the progress we had made. It is a question that was framed as a comment “Black Lives Matter” meaning “too” or “as much” as white lives. That was prompted by a growing perception that, once again, they didn’t matter as much because care was not being taken to preserve them when choices were being made. As I criticize Trump, so I criticize those who claim affiliation with the official “Black Lives Matter” movement for using anger as policy. Harassing Bernie Sanders just made them look stupid, picking on a friend who already understood and was sympathetic to their cause. Although the “All Lives Matter” backlash is often well intended, particularly as we are losing white and black police officers to killers, much of the backlash has been coming from those who did not vote for Obama and who never considered voting for him because electing him was “going too far”. That is the crowd who “want our country back” where just being white made you feel a little better even if you were trailer park trash, like before the Civil Rights movement took hold, back when black lives did not matter.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 9:52 am

Facebook Friend Elaina Deva Proffitt writes:

“Am with Arthur Kramer on this Dr King also was beyond color he did not accept Evil behavior from Anyone and he is weeping in heaven about the terror in the streets of Black on Black Killings, destruction of innocent peoples property in the black communities when protesting arrives, no positive strong leaders helping the communities to heal and take back their streets -Charleston is the Higher Example of Dr King;s teaching many Activists from the 60’s do not support the group of BLM because of the splinter group that wants death and destruction and say the presence of God is not in it which is the foundation of Dr Kings way. This in Turns destroys the support of the white communities and others where there is a lot of support but it is clouded by the name BLM by those who are using this as an opportunity to incite and separate people for their own agenda..Activists in the 60 ‘s said ALL LIVES MATTER there are many of us are still alive who grew up with this imprint watching it happen such as in Charleston these past months..the way they handle the horrific shootings in their house of prayer.. they were from MLK times. No one can change this splinter group taking over t but the Black Community which must stand up to them and show they are not included in that name/group They Ruin it for the group for the purpose of ALL Good not go out and kill ..that is sad. So many DO Want to Support. Also a major Key is the Morality or lack of It for ALL people no matter the color of their skin..there are 2 sides to the Black Lives matter one is the hating encouraging killing of cops or a white person.even taking a pic of the body or getting one on the nightly news..and .the other BLM does NOT condone that and walks in a good way… Until we Get to the WE not the ME it will never stop…”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:06 am

Facebook Friend Elaina Deva Proffitt writes:

“The KEY IS…the HOW the Protesting arrives..not for opportunists to destroy and steal when most do not even live in the communities…The victims in the communites are the ones who Weary and need Our Support and actually have received a lot from the white communities…”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:08 am

Facebook Friend Calvin De Mond writes:

“Treat people like they matter, and they will.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:08 am

Facebook Friend Robert B. Reno writes:

“I don’t know what he would say because he’s dead and can no longer speak for himself. But as a paramedic I know we all bleed red.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:09 am

Facebook Friend Sara Wagasky writes:

“Not all lives are equally discriminated against. If the movement were called ONLY Black Lives Matter I would better understand the need to respond with the ALL.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:09 am

Facebook Friend Anita Scranton writes:

“Hi Diane. Miss your Video show with Beth. I agree with you very much on this issue. When I read or hear something about this group, Martin Luther King is the 1st person I think about. In my “hippie” days, I always had so much admiration for him and his approach to unfair topics. I am finding that I respect him much more, these days. We need people like him in today’s world. He did know how to get justice where it’s needed.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:10 am

Facebook Friend Okie Lorraine writes:

“He would admonish them for being Hypocrites.”

Diane Dimond September 8, 2015 at 11:44 am

ABQ Journal Reader George Loehr writes:

“Dear Ms. Dimond,

Thank you for your excellent column on the “Black Lives Matter” movement, which appeared in the Albuquerque Journal September 5, 2015. I’d like to add an additional thought with regard to Martin Luther King. Dr. King rarely receives credit for what could be his major accomplishment: changing the hearts and minds of white Americans. He did this by appealing to their conscience; he convinced them that segregation was totally opposed to the Judeo-Christian ethos they embraced. Thus treating any human being – white or black – as anything less than a child of God and (for Christians) a sister or brother in Christ was in direct contradiction with the faith and moral code they embraced. Martin Luther King could speak on this with authority because he was himself an ordained Christian minister and a follower of that ethos. Would that we had the likes of him today.”

Very truly yours,

George C. Loehr
Albuquerque NM

Shaking my head September 9, 2015 at 5:03 am

I find it interesting but par for the course that someone in the majority community would endeavor to tell Black people how to react to the systemic brutalization and killing of their people by agents of the government who are supposed to protect them. Worse is the collusion of a judicial system that fails to curb the police’s wanton behavior. But since they have not measured up to your expectations of how they should push back against this horrible reality, they should be condemned. Only if your sensibilities are properly assauged can they rebel against what is happening to them and has been happening to them for decades (and largely dismissed) but only now has gained corroborating evidence. Where was your column condemning the police shootings and judicial acquittals before the Black Lives Matter campaign? If they only change to the more acceptable (to you) “All Lives Matter” slogan, then people like you would rally to their side. If they could just be like MLK, because he was “beloved” by the majority community during his many campaigns. He knew how to talk the right way to White people. If you don’t realize how ridiculous and condescending you sound, I cannot fathom what language I can use to explain it to you. I lived through the MLK era and White people didn’t, in the vast majority, embrace and love MLK. That happened after his death. They hated him, both in the North and the South. In fact, they called him a “rabble rouser as well, for pretty much the same reasons. Some of them didn’t care what verbiage he used. And as for this notion that All Lives Matter is better for them to use, that would make sense if all lives were under equal threat from the police. That is clearly not the case. And you don’t get to tell people how to fight back against what they consider a threat to them and the lives of their children. I don’t know what these activists were chanting and why. I simply understand that even as Blacks (12 yo boys etc.) continue to die at the hands of those sworn to protect them, for no good reason, the police were not harmed by those “chants”, however the level of poor taste. Further, to suggest that the BlacK live Matter movement is spawning violence against police, that is typical of the mentality this group is having to fight. Asking for JUSTICE for Black people is spawning violence against the police, but videos that confirm longstanding complaints of brutality and murder of Black people, that doesn’t spawn anything. By the way, the number of police dying in service has actually gone DOWN since the Black Lives Matters movement began. I am deeply sorry that you are offended by the actions of these people and that they are not living up to your expectations of a protest organization. I am certain that once they become apprised of your concerns, they will attempt to tailor their grief, fear, anger and determination into something more reflective of what you need to see before you support the “viciously radical” things they are asking for like: the independent investigations of police shootings and incidences of violence, new training for police, body cameras etc. Finally, we’d love to get MLK to weigh in on all this, but like the people that these folks are fighting for, he too was cut down by someone White, similarly troubled by what they thought was the inappropriateness of his message.

Diane Dimond September 9, 2015 at 8:28 am

I’m always glad to publish others’ points of view. And I often wonder if others are glad (at all) to hear opposing viewpoints that may conflict with theirs?
May I simply respond to your letter by saying I do not condemn the Black Lives Matter movement. Please re-read the column if you think otherwise. But yes, I (and others) am offended by their actions. I simply stated my constitutionally protected opinion that the BLM strategy needs adjustment. And to come up with a better path to get their message across they might want to study the success of Martin Luther King Jr’s. campaign for Civil Rights.
Anyone who is familiar with my work knows I am the first to jump in and condemn bad cops. You might find it hard to believe but I share — as do countless other Americans both black and white — the quest to wipe police aggression and murderous behavior off the face of the earth. I think there is a better way to go about it than the tactics currently employed by the BLM movement. ~ DD

Shaking my head September 10, 2015 at 3:22 am

Dear Diane, I do not have any problem with opposing points of view. But it is terribly frustrating to see the same reaction time and time again. If you were only nicer, if you didn’t resist, if you didn’t frown, if you didn’t avoid eye contact, if you only would make eye contact, if you only acted like that person we find more “palatable”, if only you didn’t wear a hoody, etc, then you would be more acceptable and what you are going through would matter more to us. The Black Lives Matter movement should be more concerned about how they are inconveniencing the police, possibly putting “them” in danger by protesting against “them” killing you. I know you may not have meant that but that is what it sounds like to us. And you are NOT alone. A majority of American do not stand behind the movement because they still believe the police when they tell people that they were in fear of their lives when they shoot these folks, that’s even if they go to court at all. But your reflections on MLK were the most troubling. I watched what he went through and saw what people said and did to him. I had NO illusions about him being able to say just the right thing to get “everyone” to embrace his message. That simple wasn’t the case. So the ultimate lesson for the Black Lives Matter is that you have to make people “uncomfortable” with their acceptance of the status quo, uncomfortable with their current belief system and, yes, the police uncomfortable with the notion that people they mistreat(and kill) are going to continue to allow it. Change won’t result without that sustained discomfort. Challenging the notions that you printed starkly is part of that process so I am happy for your article and the opportunity to share my very uncomfortable response.

mplo February 4, 2016 at 11:18 am

Sure, protests are going to be somewhat disruptive to some degree or other, but there are limits as to how far that can be taken. It’s one thing to make it a little harder for people to move about to get to where they’re going, but physically preventing people from going about their daily lives and business, by preventing them from going into stores or other places of business, and blocking freeways with fast-moving vehicular traffic on them are extremely irresponsible…and dangerous, to boot.

Ambulances should not have to be diverted, causing patients to have to get care at second-rate hospitals, for example. This is what happened at several BLM protests here in Boston a little over a year ago, and it had some disastrous results.

In days gone by, instead of causing ambulances to have to be diverted, demonstrators and protestors were made to step aside to let ambulances and other emergency vehicles through. That’s not happening today, which bodes no good for any movement for social change.

Carmen Stepek December 24, 2015 at 1:01 am

Young black woman here, and I agree 100%. Young black men and women can do more than walking around with signs and angry faces. Pick up a book, go to school, make a REAL difference..

Audrey July 9, 2016 at 5:03 pm

it’s amazing that you’re more offended by the BLM chanting ‘threats’ to kill cops than you are by cops actually killing Black people. Really says a lot about where your priorities are

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