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by Diane Dimond on January 6, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7185" align="alignleft" width="150"] BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION, Deputy Wyatt Earp circa mid 1800's[/caption]

Not since the days when Wyatt Earp worked the Wild West wearing a badge and a gun has there been such good news for law enforcement.

The number of federal, Real brand NORDIAZEPAM online, state, local, tribal and territorial officers in the U.S, where to buy NORDIAZEPAM. who died in the line of duty last year dropped to a total of 111. Think about that. NORDIAZEPAM brand name, In the whole United States of America we lost only 111 officers during 2013. That’s the lowest number since 1959.

The most encouraging news in the latest report from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) is seen in the death-by-gun category. At a time when there is so much worry about rampant gun deaths only 33 officers, nationwide, lost their lives in the line of duty due to a firearm fatality, BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION. The number would have been even lower had it not been for a former Los Angeles cop named Christopher Dorner who went on a shooting spree last February and killed four people, NORDIAZEPAM class, including three L.A. Generic NORDIAZEPAM, police officers.

The number of law enforcement gun deaths hasn't been that low since 1887, back in the post-gold rush days when deputized frontiersmen tried to keep the peace in places with names like Tombstone, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, Arizona. Where can i find NORDIAZEPAM online, [caption id="attachment_7186" align="alignright" width="150"] Remembering the Dead[/caption]

So, at a time when the country seems consumed with worry about mass shootings like the ones at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.; the school in Newtown, australia, uk, us, usa, Connecticut; and the movie theater in Aurora, Buy cheap NORDIAZEPAM no rx, Colorado how is it that law enforcement is enjoying such a low mortality rate. BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION, NLEOMF Chairman and CEO, Craig Floyd, attributes it to an increased “culture of safety” within police departments. For example, Floyd says, NORDIAZEPAM maximum dosage, after a spike in officer gun deaths in 2011 more members of law enforcement routinely began wearing bullet proof vests. NORDIAZEPAM street price, “The only good news is zero deaths,” Floyd said, “But this very significant drop in law enforcement fatalities the past two years is extremely encouraging."

Let’s get real, where can i buy NORDIAZEPAM online. The lower police mortality rate is not all attributable to cops being more careful on-the-job. Buy NORDIAZEPAM without prescription, Our justice system is keeping more criminals behind bars and for longer periods of time. Massive prison overcrowding, nationwide, proves that, BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION.

[caption id="attachment_7187" align="alignleft" width="150"] Always Ready To Protect[/caption]

There have been major developments in crime fighting technology, like strategic placement of surveillance cameras in trouble spots, cheap NORDIAZEPAM. There has been a push to complete a backlog of DNA tests helping pinpoint viable suspects and that keeps officers out of risky investigative situations. NORDIAZEPAM dosage, And let’s not forget the active gun buy-back programs and neighborhood watch campaigns that help keep our streets safer.

In addition, the American population is aging, NORDIAZEPAM results. BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION, The median age is now 37.2 years old – well past the prime crime-committing ages of 13 to 25.

While 39 people were executed for their crimes in America last year I’m not convinced by arguments that capital punishment actually deters crime. Buy NORDIAZEPAM from mexico, If you look at a graph of annual crime statistics next to a graph of peak execution years (1997-2002) it is easy to see the total number of crimes fluctuated only slightly.

There is no measurable proof that criminals with murder in mind stop to re-think their actions because their ultimate punishment could be the death chamber. Most murderous lawbreakers aren't known for stopping to think things through, NORDIAZEPAM cost.

There is surely a combination of factors that delivers to us the good news that there were fewer law enforcement deaths in 2013, BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION. And it’s probably a good time for all of us to stop and think about all those brave men and women who leave their homes every day to keep us safe knowing they could pay the ultimate price for simply doing their job. Online NORDIAZEPAM without a prescription, [caption id="attachment_7189" align="alignright" width="120"] Every Day Could Be Their Last[/caption]

Law enforcement deaths are all so arbitrary. Can you imagine working in a career where at any moment you could die.

Last year a majority of officers – 46 – lost their lives in traffic-related accidents, NORDIAZEPAM wiki. BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION, 18 died of job-related illnesses. Six fell to their deaths while working, NORDIAZEPAM price, coupon, 2 drowned, 2 others were stabbed to death, one was electrocuted, buy NORDIAZEPAM from canada, 1 died in a helicopter crash and one was blown to bits in an explosion. Purchase NORDIAZEPAM for sale, No surprise that working on Friday and Saturday nights proved to be the most lethal but Tuesday night also proved pretty deadly. February and September were a peace officer’s the most dangerous months. Most of the officers who died were male, NORDIAZEPAM overnight, 107 of them. Four were female and, on average, the dead was the parent of at least two children, BUY NORDIAZEPAM NO PRESCRIPTION. Buying NORDIAZEPAM online over the counter, The oldest officer to die was 70 and the youngest was 23.

The state of Texas led the nation with 13 fatalities, followed by California (10), buy NORDIAZEPAM no prescription, Mississippi (10) and New York (10). Is NORDIAZEPAM safe, Arkansas (6) rounded out the top five on the list.

The last officers to die were Sgt. Robert Baron of Sandoval County, order NORDIAZEPAM online c.o.d, New Mexico who was struck by a car while investigating a crash and Sgt. NORDIAZEPAM alternatives, Kevin Stauffer of Tupelo, Mississippi who was killed while pursuing armed bank robbers.

Sadly, NORDIAZEPAM samples, their names will soon be added to the nearly 20 thousand other names carved into the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, D.C

Yes, while 2013 saw a record low death toll of law enforcement personnel, 2014 is probably a good time to stop a cop and say thanks.

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{ 11 comments… read them below or add one }

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 11:50 am

Noozhawk Reader tarracali writes:

“Most cops who are shot are shot with a handgun. A good “bulletproof” vest will stop a handgun round. The average criminal is not a good shot so they are not going to hit someone with a fatal head shot unless it’s a lucky shot. In order to kill someone wearing a “bulletproof” vest a criminal would have to shoot the person with a high powered rifle round like a .308 or a 30-06 or be a really good shot and hit them in the face. I cannot remember the last time I saw a cop who was not wearing a vest.”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 11:55 am

ABQ Journal Reader Al Chadir writes:

” Ms. DiMond’s article misleads. Primary Line-of-Duty cause of death for Law Officers was traffic accidents. Many were single car crashes due to speeding. Secondary cause of death was gunshots (33), some sadly, Blue-on-Blue shootings. Third was heart attacks. Just the facts. A. C.”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 11:56 am

Dear Mr. Chadir:

I write a NATIONALLY SYNDICATED column. This column was not – repeat not – written just for consumption in ABQ, New Mexico – but rather by people who read newspapers all across the country.
(note: ABQ is my hometown and while I visit as often as possible I live on the East Coast now)

I write about crime and justice issues every week and this week I simply chose to write about the fact that fewer law enforcement officers NATIONWIDE were dying from gunshots. My short little 900 word column does not contain every nuance about a topic – how could it with that word count limitation?

Your passion for the subject of the ABQ Police Department is quite apparent and, yes, I know that the Feds have been involved internally with the APD for a while now. As a matter of professional courtesy (and because I don’t live in ABQ full time) I leave it to my capable colleagues at the ABQ Journal to cover the APD situation.

While you may not consider your local police officers to be heroes of any kind I do consider all law enforcement NATIONWIDE to be worthy of our respect. They are on the front lines every day, risking their lives in very tenuous situations, keeping the peace as best they can. Are there bad apples in the law enforcement bunch? You bet there. Just like there are bad doctors, teachers, truck drivers – any other profession.

I for one am glad that 2013 set record lows for police deaths.

Thanks for writing….And, if I’m reading through the lines correctly, thank you for YOUR service as a cop. It’s a very important job. “

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 11:58 am

Mr. Chadir,
Please read the entire column. I did mention the traffic accident deaths. But the focus of the column was the surprisingly low number of law enforcement deaths due to gunshot. … the lowest since the 1880′s! ~ DD

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 12:01 pm

I did read your entire column. You mention nowhere that MANY of the traffic deaths are 1 car accidents and due to officers speeding; that only 33 officers died as a result of gunshot wounds and some of those were blue-on-blue shootings; and that heart attacks, due to the officers being badly out of shape, were the 3rd leading cause of death.

If you do your research you will see that the MOST DANGEROUS jobs in America, in order of dangerousness are: 1) Loggers 2) Fishermen 3) Airplane Pilots 4) Roofers 5) Iron Workers 6) Sanitation Workers 7) Power Linesmen 8) Truckers 9) Farmers and Ranchers 10) Construction Laborers.

Articles like yours, while well-meaning, give Police Officers, especially ALBUQUERQUE POLICE OFFICERS WHO DON’T DESERVE IT, the idea they are some kind of heroes out there putting their lives on the line for US. It’s the other way around. Albuquerque Police Officers, and more and more other Police Officers nationally (sadly) PUT OUR LIVES ON THE LINE FOR THEM.

Here in Albuquerque they regularly murder their wives, engage in auto insurance fraud, and tamper with evidence, etc. (Levi Chavez case); murder their unarmed, much older stepfathers in their stepfather’s own home (Orlando Camacho Case); rape 13 and 14 year old girls (Timothy Chavez case and Tank Gunther cases); run over unconscious woman SEVERAL TIMES in a parking lot while driving drunk, leave the scene of the fatality; murder an UNARMED US AIR FORCE RETIRED OFFICER by shooting him in the back and falsifying the incident report stating the poor man had been inside a home and was reaching for a weapon (Officer Carr case) ; torture a homeless man with a Taser until he is severely burned and looses part of an ear for no reason (Jerome J. Hall case- he was awarded $307,037 by a federal jury but was assassinated less than 7 days after the ward was made, before he had a chance to collect it); loot the Albuquerque Police Evidence room (Officer Robbin Burge case – March 2, 2006, Page 1 Albuquerque Journal) and THEY ALL GET AWAY WITH IT.

Albuquerque taxpayers have paid $26 MILLION since 2010 for Police abuses and there are more cases still pending to be settled! Don’t let these pathetic excuses for police officers we have in Albuquerque get the idea that they are HEROES who put THEMSELVES on the line for US- it’s the other way around!

That’s why the FBI has been here for the last year investigating these thugs! They are out of control, Ms. DiMond! I’m not shouting at you. Capitals are used for emphasis. This is a VERY EMOTIONAL topic for me. I was a GOOD COP. These people are no better than criminals!!! Capitals used for emphasis.
Sincerely,
Al Chadir”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 12:02 pm

Mr. Chadir,
I write a NATIONALLY SYNDICATED column. This column was not – repeat not – written just for consumption in ABQ, New Mexico – but rather by people who read newspapers all across the country.

(note: ABQ is my hometown and while I visit as often as possible I live on the East Coast now)

I write about crime and justice issues every week and this week I simply chose to write about the fact that fewer law enforcement officers NATIONWIDE were dying from gunshots. My short little 900 word column does not contain every nuance about a topic – how could it with that word count limitation?

Your passion for the subject of the ABQ Police Department is quite apparent and, yes, I know that the Feds have been involved internally with the APD for a while now. As a matter of professional courtesy (and because I don’t live in ABQ full time) I leave it to my capable colleagues at the ABQ Journal to cover the APD situation.

While you may not consider your local police officers to be heroes of any kind I do consider all law enforcement NATIONWIDE to be worthy of our respect. They are on the front lines every day, risking their lives in very tenuous situations, keeping the peace as best they can. Are there bad apples in the law enforcement bunch? You bet there. Just like there are bad doctors, teachers, truck drivers – any other profession.

I for one am glad that 2013 set record lows for police deaths.

Thanks for writing….And, if I’m reading through the lines correctly, thank you for YOUR service as a cop. It’s a very important job. “

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 12:05 pm

Noozhawk Reader Roger Veon writes:

“How many police officers discharged their gun last year ?
What or who did they hit?
What were the consequences?
Should all police be armed?
Should everybody be armed?”

Rog

Reply

Diane Dimond January 6, 2014 at 2:32 pm

Twitter Pal DrSteveAlbrecht writes:

” @DiDimond @GaryJournalist If we could only get our cops to always wear their vests and seat belts, and use weapons retention holsters too.”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 8, 2014 at 9:23 pm

Facebook Friend Bill Voinovich writes:

” GOOD.
Those guys have a tough enough job & that’s just one less thing to weigh them down….”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 8, 2014 at 9:23 pm

Facebook Friend David Loving writes:

“Nice article. One thing; every day could be everybody’s last.”

Reply

Diane Dimond January 16, 2014 at 4:50 pm

Huffington Post Reader Craig Schultz writes:

“Let’s get real.”

Please do. Considering that as late as 2011, deaths of police officers in the line of duty had been increasing dramatically, it is not very reasonable to base any why, what or how based on the criminal justice system without showing at least a correlation commensurate with the changes in the number of deaths seen.

http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2011/12/28/9775223-police-deaths-rise-sharply-again?lite

Reply

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