Personal

Time to Remember the Victims

Time to Remember the Victims

As the coroner’s van took away one of the bodies, I walked toward the bloodied sidewalk outside Nicole Brown Simpson’s condo. I’ll never forget what I saw that day. Law enforcement had come and gone and left behind only some strips of yellow police tape.

It might have been 20 years ago, but I can still see the rivulets of blood between the pavers at the condo’s entryway. Later I would learn that the paw prints and feathery marks punctuating the bloodbath were made by Nicole’s dog. In his confused state, the Akita had obviously circled the bloody scene, its leash traversing through the red and leaving a swoosh of stain all the way down to the corner stop sign.

With the evidence gathering clearly over, I remember thinking, “Why didn’t someone wash away all this blood?” [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

firingsquadOld

Should We Return to the Old Days?

It’s clearly time to bring back firing squads.

If we’re going to keep carrying out the death penalty in this country and if we are going to continue to grandly insist that they are “humane executions” then only a return to a firing squad will insure a speedy and relatively pain free death for the condemned.

You might think I’m kidding but I’m not. I say, line up six to eight sharp shooters, employ the old practice of giving one of them a blank instead of a bullet and instruct them to aim for the prisoner’s heart. I guarantee the convict will be dead before they drop to the ground. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Kids and Guns and Public Safety

by Diane Dimond on January 27, 2014

In Homes With Guns, Teach Kids Gun Safety!

Uncle Jim used to herd a group of us kids into the car on a sunny Saturday morning and head to an isolated area outside town. His son, little Jim, my two cousins Sandy and Terry and I were full of anticipation.

We were going target shooting – with a real gun – guided every step of the way in gun safety by Uncle Jim. I was about ten or eleven years old, the oldest kid in the group.

“Always keep a gun pointed toward the ground until you are ready to shoot,” Uncle Jim would say as he set up soda cans on a fence post about 20 yards away. “Never, ever point a gun toward another person.”

There on the southwest mesa outside Albuquerque we would wait patiently until it was our turn to handle the pistol. Uncle Jim would stand right behind us and guide the gun into our hands, showing us the proper technique of cradling the hands around the bottom of the gun while placing an index finger on the trigger. Then he’d take a step back as we raised our arms and tell us to shoot when we were ready. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

A Columnists Favorite Column, An Homage to Charley Reese

by Diane Dimond on December 16, 2013

Newspaperman Charley Reese

Professionals of all types admire others in their field. Architects respect certain other architects, singers style themselves after singers who came before them, artists can find inspiration from someone else’s work.

As a columnist I have a favorite too. The best columns I ever read – and ones I remember for their common sense ideas, written in common-man language – were penned by veteran newspaperman Charley Reese.

I didn’t agree with everything he wrote but I cherished his style. Although I write about crime and justice and Reese wrote about politics and international issues for the most part, I admit I have tried to achieve his simple way of communicating ideas. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Enough Surveillance Already!

by Diane Dimond on July 22, 2013

 

Too Much Spying on Innocent Americans?

Okay, now I’m mad.

I know we live in a hyper-vigilant time. I know there are terrorists who would like to kill as many Americans as possible and some are living right here in the United States actively plotting murder and mayhem. But, I have had just about enough of our government snooping and conducting surveillance on innocent Americans. And so many Americans!

Look, I’ve worked in the area of crime and justice for a long time. I get the need to conduct undercover and clandestine operations – but the sheer scope of what’s been going on is absolutely chilling.

Think of it this way: You go to the airport to catch a flight and every single passenger is treated as a suspicious character, right? The grip of political correctness forbids airport security from singling out those who history has shown would be most likely to perpetrate a terrorist act on a plane – i.e. Young men of Middle Eastern Muslim heritage bent on conducting acts of jihad against non-believers. At the airport everyone – from tiny babies to old people in wheelchairs – gets treated like a potential criminal. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Does Dept Make You Feel Secure?

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about our Department of Homeland Security lately. The DHS was formed after the September 11, 2001 attacks, of course, but since then it has grown to mammoth proportions. It now has more than 200,000 employees and it is the nation’s third largest Cabinet department after the Defense Department and Veterans Affairs.

The taxpayer’s bill for DHS is also enormous. If all goes as planned you and I will send $59 billion more of our hard earned dollars to the DHS this year to advance their mission to, “prevent attacks and protect Americans – on the land, in the sea and in the air.”

Here we are more than a dozen years after 9-11 – and hundreds of billions of dollars later – and we still have no foolproof way to sift through our own suspected terrorist watch list. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Is Your Stoplight Watching You?

by Diane Dimond on April 15, 2013

Traffic Camera Are Everywhere

I didn’t realize I had broken the law until I opened an official envelope with a traffic ticket inside. Each time this has happened I’ve thought, “Darn those traffic cameras!” Okay, I likely said something spicier than that because there’s little else to say in one’s defense when confronted with photographic evidence that you have run a red light.

Twice New York State has sent me tickets for running a red light as I struggled to turn left in crushing New York City traffic. The third time the news came from my cousin, Sandy Hays, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

She called to tell me that when I had borrowed her husband’s car during a trip to my hometown I had been caught speeding on an off-ramp near the University of New Mexico. Embarrassed, I sent her a check for $75.00 to cover the fine. A month or so later Sandy sent me a return check saying the city had [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

America Needs a Revolution – Part II

by Diane Dimond on January 14, 2013

Let’s Take Away Congress’s Red Ink Pen

 

Sometimes a columnist touches a raw nerve. I did that last week with my call for a citizen’s “Revolution in Thinking” about how we allow our politicians to operate.

Using lyrics from Les Miserable, the movie about the French Revolution, I wrote about the anger of so many Americans who want better for this country. They want the rivers of red-ink to stop flowing. They want political leaders to lead and to stop throwing up partisan barricades in a political war that does no one any good.

No sooner was the column published than my e-mail box exploded! [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Lessons From Mother Nature in Wake of Hurricane Sandy

by Diane Dimond on November 5, 2012

Super Storm Sandy Smashes the East

More than 110 people were killed but there was no crime. There were widespread blackouts yet there was no systematic looting. Police departments were run ragged but lawlessness seemed to take a vacation.

This column isn’t about crime this time. It is about how, in the the face of crisis crime is replaced by an overwhelming sense of fellowship and mutual survival. Thanks to Hurricane Sandy I am writing this not on my usual laptop computer but on a smaller iPad which is cumbersome to operate via candlelight. I had to slowly charge it to life via a cord plugged into my car’s cigarette lighter.

My family is among the almost five million Americans left without power by this monumental storm. We’re told it could be 10 days before our Hudson River village, about 20 miles north of Manhattan will have electricity again.

But we are alive and feeling so lucky. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }

Good Riddance, Mr. Sandusky

by Diane Dimond on October 15, 2012

Sandusky Arrives for Sentencing

As my mother used to say, “He looked like death warmed over.”When Jerry Sandusky entered the courthouse in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania to hear his sentence he looked like a completely different man.

Gone was the suit and tie I saw him wear each day of his child sex abuse trial. Gone was the bounce in his step and his rosy cheeks. Today, after nearly four months in solitary confinement, the convicted child sex predator looks as though he’s lost at least thirty pounds. His red prison scrubs hung loosely from his body. His gait was wobbly, his posture stooped and his face a pasty grey. He blew a kiss to his wife in the far right front row and grimaced as he sat on the hard wooden chair at the defense table. [click to continue…]

{ Comments on this entry are closed }