Law Enforcement

Private Investigators as Heroes of Justice

by Diane Dimond on April 21, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7478" align="alignleft" width="150"] Unsung Heroes - Private Investigators[/caption] Time for a word about private investigators. TV dramas of the past left the impression that the primary reason to hire a P.I. was to tail an unfaithful spouse. There was always the obligatory scene in which a semi-shady looking private detective appeared with a stack of 8 x 10’s as proof of infidelity and slithered away with a check from the not-so-shocked husband or wife. Certainly, that is one of the services a P.I. can provide but today licensed private detectives are much more valuable than just that. These days, police departments are too busy, underfunded and under-trained to follow up on every complaint. Corporate espionage, computer hacking, identity theft and missing persons reports abound and it is the ranks of private investigators that often come to the rescue. Private detectives can also offer a valuable extra set of eyes when it comes to reviewing old police files and, specifically, working to help those who were wrongfully convicted. [caption id="attachment_7472" align="alignright" width="150"] Bob Rahn, Management Resources Ltd of NY[/caption] Take the P.I. team of super-sleuths Bob Rahn and Kim Anklin of Management Resources Ltd. They are the unsung heroes in the recent case of exonerated prisoner Jonathan Fleming who spent 25 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. In August 1989, a man named Darryl Rush was murdered outside a Brooklyn, New York housing project. Fleming’s car was seen speeding away from the scene and an eyewitness said she saw Fleming. At trial, the jury heard evidence that Fleming was a thousand miles away, in Orlando, Florida with his family, at the time of the murder. His attorney produced airplane tickets, video and photos, hotel and telephone receipts and several members of the Fleming family testified that Jonathan was with them at Disney World when the murder took place. But the prosecutor maintained there were 53 different flights Fleming could have taken back to New York to commit the crime and then quickly return to Florida. Despite the fact that no evidence was ever produced showing Fleming took any extra flights he was convicted and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. Fleming’s mother never gave up the fight to free her son. Over the years she hired a couple of different private detectives who took her money but did little. Finally last year, the family found the P.I. team of Rahn and Anklin. [caption id="attachment_7473" align="alignleft" width="150"] Kim Anklin, Management Resources Ltd of NY[/caption] “We took a small retainer for a few weeks’ worth of work,” Anklin told me. They started their investigation by pouring over a box full of old legal files, including the original police reports which revealed solid leads never pursued. Rahn and Anklin visited the crime scene, took measurements and realized the eyewitness could never have seen the murder from her vantage point. After they tracked her down she admitted she had been high on crack that night and had recanted her statement to police three weeks after the murder. “We realized pretty quickly that Jonathan didn't do it,” Rahn said. “There just was no physical evidence except that one faulty eye-witness.” Their retainer soon ran out but this dogged team decided they just couldn’t abandon the case. “Jonathan’s mother begged us to keep working,” Anklin said. “And I told Bob, this case is going to haunt us the rest of our lives if we don’t do something.” During their frequent phone calls with Jonathan they promised to keep working to help win his freedom. [caption id="attachment_7474" align="alignright" width="150"] Jonathan Fleming -  With His PI Team[/caption] The P.I.’s discovered that buried within a police report was the name of a witness who was never mentioned in court. They tracked her down and she said she had told police the murder occurred right outside her window. She had seen three men looking for the victim, (one had a gun in his waistband) and heard the victim being menaced by them right before the fatal shot. She had given police two of the men’s names but detectives never followed up thinking she was not trustworthy. Rahn and Anklin also found another witness who swore that right after the murder she had seen the trio and overheard their conversation. “She heard them say to each other, ‘Is he dead?’ and ‘How many times did you shoot him?’” Rahn explained. One of the men was her brother and she said when she later confronted them they admitted committing the murder. The jury never heard this witness either. The P.I.’s reported their findings to the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Conviction Integrity Unit and together they set out for South Carolina to question one of the three men. Almost unbelievably he confessed to his part in the murder and identified the other two guilty parties. He also admitted he had been the one seen fleeing the scene that night in Fleming’s car. Fleming had entrusted him with the keys while he vacationed in Florida. [caption id="attachment_7475" align="alignleft" width="150"] Fleming Hugs Mom For First Time in 25 Years[/caption] On April 7th, 2014 - - exactly one year to the day after Rahn and Anklin took the case - - Jonathan Fleming, now 51, was exonerated by a judge and walked free. His lawyers are now suing “everyone,” as they put it. If they win a monetary settlement Rahn and Anklin expect they will finally be compensated for the more than 1,000 hours of pro bono work they put in on the case. Naturally, not all private investigators are as honest and devoted. And most won’t work without being paid. But this pair has suggestions should you ever need to hire a P.I.. First, check them out on the internet. “Make sure they are properly licensed,” Rahn said. “See if they have any complaints against them. Ask for references from the P.I. and call them. And, any investigator worth their salt is going to be a member of a professional organization – probably more than one.” Also, check to see that the investigator has experience in working your type of case. “Google is your best friend,” Anklin said. “But use your common sense with what you find out. And ask a lot of questions. Just like the Flemings did with us.” home  

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The U.S. Prison System Needs a Total Makeover

by Diane Dimond on April 14, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7447" align="alignleft" width="150"] Time to Re-Think the Prison System[/caption]  "We have embraced the idea that being mentally sick is a crime ..." It is way past time to overhaul the U.S. prison system. I’m not talking about a little tweak here and there. I’m talking about throwing a massive metaphorical hand grenade into the entire system and starting over from scratch. We should be ashamed of ourselves for allowing the system to have morphed into what it has. Why should you care about this? Well, because you’re paying for it. Between states and the federal government the U.S. spends about $74 billion a year housing, feeding, providing health care (such as it is in prison) for inmates and supervising the newly released. [caption id="attachment_7449" align="alignright" width="150"] America Leads the World - Per Capita - In Prisoners[/caption] The Bureau of Justice Statistics reported in 2012 there were nearly 7 million Americans under the supervision of adult correctional systems. Translated: One in every 108 adults in the United States was incarcerated, a per-capita world record. The problem, as I see it, centers on who we are locking up. The Washington Post reports that only one percent of them are in for murder. Four percent are serving time for robbery. The most serious charge against 51 percent of them is a drug offense. But here is the most startling, heart-wrenching statistic of them all. According to a Justice Department study more than half of the prisoners in the U.S. suffer from a bona fide mental illness. Among female inmates, about three-quarters have a diagnosable mental disorder. Why in the world are we locking up the mentally ill in the same place we house violent and predatory criminals? The answer is simple. Because there is nowhere else to put the “crazy people,” so we put them in jail after they act out. Many times their families have spent years begging for mental health care for their disturbed loved one to no avail. And sometimes, the “crazy people” deliberately commit crimes knowing they will be housed, fed and minimally medicated in lockup. [caption id="attachment_7450" align="alignleft" width="150"] Danvers Mental Hospital Stayed Open Until 1992[/caption] Back in the mid-‘50s, psychotropic drugs like Thorazine were found to be so successful in quelling mental patient’s delusions and agitation that within a decade society decided it was cruel to continue to institutionalize them. The abuse of patients and unsanitary conditions found at some mental hospitals were ascribed to all such institutions so we closed them down. Patients were given a prescription for their meds and told they were “free.” No one seemed to notice that the planned community mental health centers never materialized and when one of these former patients had a problem there were very few places they could go for help. The pattern continues to this day. There are simply not enough mental health beds to service everyone who needs help. Today, commitment is difficult and, sadly, we have to wait for the mentally ill to actually commit a crime before the state steps in. In the last few years, many of America’s mass murders were committed by untreated mentally ill people who should have been in a mental health care facility -- for their protection and for ours. It’s ironic, isn't it? The very society that once agreed it was unjust to lock people up in mental hospitals now allows the mentally disturbed to be locked up in much more dangerous jails and prisons. [caption id="attachment_7454" align="alignright" width="150"] Half the Prison Population Suffer From Mental Illness[/caption] We have turned our backs on these folks and our prisons have become de facto psychiatric facilities. We have decided that these are throwaway human beings and embrace the idea that being mentally sick is a crime. Our children and grandchildren are going to look back and wonder what was wrong with us. I could fill this entire page with quotes from wardens describing the horror of what happens to sufferers of schizophrenia, bi-polar disorders and other mental illnesses once they enter prison. But the ugly truth is that some of those same wardens employ practices that are, literally, creating even more disturbed individuals. The widespread use of solitary confinement in prisons has been shown to have a tremendously negative effect. Mostly because inmates -- be they habitually violent, in danger from other prisoners or simply a rule breaker -- are often held for months and even years in isolation. You know what being locked up, alone, for years at a time does to the human mind? According to Dr. Stuart Grassian, a veteran psychiatrist from Harvard who is considered an expert on the effects of solitary confinement, prolonged seclusion only leads inmates to exhibit more impulsive and violent behavior. “Ninety-five percent of these people will get out and be released back on the streets,” Grassian said on a National Geographic documentary. “All isolation will have done is make them as violent, crazy and dangerous as possible when they get out.” [caption id="attachment_7455" align="alignleft" width="150"] Solitary Confinement Does Definite Damage[/caption] So how long does the system continue doing what we know doesn’t work? When do the priorities shift away from warehousing chronic drug addicts with the hope that they will somehow cure themselves by their release date? When do we stop thinking it is morally defensible to house the mentally ill alongside career gang-bangers, rapists and killers? And, what will it take to convince prison administrators to reject the rage-filling practice of prolonged solitary confinement? Look, I’m not advocating letting anyone out of prison. I’m suggesting its way past time to take a fresh look at revolutionary new ways to spend that $74 billion every year. How about we start with a plan that separates the hard-core, habitual criminals from the mentally sick and persistently addicted? Keep the first group in a standard prison setting. Then, turn some of our prisons into psychiatric centers to help the more fragile inmates. The past confirms that an overwhelming majority of those who suffer from mental illness and addiction are not violent. They are lost souls who could possibly get their lives set straight if exposed to the right therapies and medications. [caption id="attachment_7459" align="alignright" width="120"] Mass Killer Laughner's Parents Looked for Mental Help For Years[/caption] I’m embarrassed that we have adopted a toss-and-forget attitude about so many of our weakest citizens. Prison is not where they belong and it certainly isn't where they will ever learn to become contributing members of society again. By continuing our current policies we insure only one thing: America’s per-capita standing as the world’s number one jailer. home  

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Pets Help Solve Crimes

by Diane Dimond on April 7, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7435" align="alignleft" width="150"] First Animal DNA Lab in the U.S.[/caption] As far as crime laboratories go it is not very impressive looking. And it is not very big, with a permanent staff of just three forensic scientists and a few interns. But the work product that comes out of the Veterinarian Forensic Lab at the University of California at Davis is important and it has changed the way crimes are investigated and prosecuted worldwide. The lab has been called the “CSI of the four legged world” and it is the nation’s first laboratory dedicated to animal DNA profiling. It’s accredited by the prestigious American Society of Crime Lab Directors because the VFL conducts animal-related forensic tests as rigorously as any lab dealing with human DNA. [caption id="attachment_7437" align="alignright" width="150"] VFL Tests DNA from Horses to Llamas and Dogs to Cats[/caption] Simply put, the VFL uses DNA from animals to help solve a variety of crimes – from burglary and animal abuse to sexual assault and murder. They analyze crime scene evidence that, decades ago, might have been overlooked by detectives. Today, investigators automatically collect any animal fur or hairs, feces, urine stains and tissue samples found at a crime scene. They also take mouth swabs from pets after they defend their owners against attackers. The case that helped establish the lab came from New Hampton, Iowa in 1999. A sexual assault victim was not able to pick her attacker out of a police line-up. But, she remembered that as she stood near the man’s truck to answer his request for directions her dog had lifted his leg and urinated on one of the tires. Two days later, police found the truck, swabbed the tire and the lab (then the foremost test center for bloodtyping cattle) was able to place the suspect where he insisted he had never been - - alongside the victim. That conviction convinced every one of the need for a full-time animal DNA testing lab. The VFL’s Director, Beth Wictum, told me the lab handles about 100 cases every year. She’s particularly proud of their work on a grisly triple homicide case out of Indiana. The suspect insisted he had not stood at the spot where three workmen had been shot execution style. But police found a shoe print left behind in a poop patty and scooped up the evidence for evaluation. The lab was able to genetically match the droppings to the property owner’s dog and to a pencil eraser sized specimen taken from the suspect’s shoe. Bingo! The suspect was convicted and is serving life in prison. [caption id="attachment_7438" align="alignleft" width="150"] VFL Director Beth Wictum at the Lab[/caption] On Christmas Eve 2002, Kevin Butler became the victim of a deadly home invasion. When two men stormed in to Butler’s Dallas apartment and began to beat him, his prized cockatoo - - named Bird for basketball great Larry Bird - - tried to come to Butler’s rescue. He repeatedly dove down on the attackers, clawing at their skin and pecking at their heads. Sadly, police found Bird dead on the kitchen floor, stabbed to death with a fork. But in the blood trails Bird created and in the valiant pet’s beak they found human DNA. The lab matched the specimens to the prime suspect and helped put Butler’s murderer behind bars for life. Director Wictum says her forensic team is, “often asked to test cat and dog hairs from blankets, rugs and sheets that are wrapped around homicide victims.” Just such a cold case out of Florida is Wictum’s current favorite. The body of Shantay Huntington was found in a wooded area of Loxahatchee, Florida wrapped in a shower curtain. CSI agents found dog hairs on the curtain and sent them to the VFL for testing. The lab identified the hairs as matching a family of dogs that were raised by Liliana Toledo. When questioned, she pointed the finger at Guillermo Romero her former brother-in-law who she described as terrifying and violent. He was raising two of the Akita puppies. When police got a DNA sample from Romero it also matched DNA on the curtain. Case solved. [caption id="attachment_7439" align="alignright" width="150"] The VFL Helped ID Shantay Huntington's Killer[/caption] Besides its work in the U.S. the VFL has worked criminal investigations in several countries including Japan, Ireland, Canada, Australia and Argentina. Scotland Yard approached the lab to help solve the stabbing death of a bouncer outside a pub. Drops of non-human blood had flummoxed the Brits. “We did the testing,” Wictum said during a radio interview, “And we were able to match the blood on the sidewalk to the suspect’s dog which had apparently had his ear nicked during the altercation.” It was the first time dog DNA was used in a UK trial. Many times bereft pet owners contact the lab to find out how their beloved Fluffy or Fido died. Wictum remembers one particular case in which a woman felt sure that a certain neighbor’s dog had killed her cat. DNA tests of the cat’s wounds proved the culprit had been a bobcat. The lab works lots of dog-on-human attack cases, many of them involving children. In fact, one such case was upgraded to homicide after the female victim was taken off life support and died. But the staff at VFL knows first-hand that what humans do to animals can be just as vicious. [caption id="attachment_7440" align="alignleft" width="150"] Animal Abusers Often Kill Humans[/caption] Law enforcement in Florida had their eye on a suspected serial animal abuser and sent items to the lab for testing. Police believed this man had started out torturing hamsters, graduated to shooting razor arrows at livestock and then began killing goats and llamas in hideous ways. The lab was able to link the suspect to the grisly crimes when they identified the blood on his shirt as being from a llama. After the arrest the lead detective breathed a sigh of relief “He told me that they were going to keep an eye on him once he got out of prison because he was looked to be at high risk for eventually killing people,” Wictum said. All of us with pets have a special bond – a special way of communicating with our beloved animals. Now, thanks to the Veterinarian Forensic Lab whether the animal is the victim, the perpetrator or simply a witness to a crime, they can communicate to the courts as well. home  

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The 40th Anniversary of ‘The Year of Fear’

by Diane Dimond on March 31, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7418" align="alignleft" width="150"] They Command Our Fascination[/caption] There is no subject that brings in more reader reaction than when I write about serial killers. The answer to why we are so fascinated by these multiple murderers is mercurial depending on who you ask. Dr. Scott Bonn, a professor of criminology at Drew University says, “Serial Killers seem to be for adults what monster movies are for children. It’s exciting -– it’s arousing,” to learn about their exploits. Dr. Casey Jordan, a criminologist, behavioral analyst, and attorney in private practice says we are captivated by stories about serial killers because, “We wonder to what extent they are just like us.” I would take it one step further and say we are riveted to details about serial killers because we wonder if we might ever reach a point where we could do what they do. I read as much about the topic as I can and during recent research about serial killers I discovered an intriguing set of facts dating back four decades. You might say this is the 40th anniversary of the “Year of Fear.” In the ‘70s the U.S. experienced a frightening uptick in the number of active serial killers. In that decade, according to the serial killer information center at Radford University, there were 450 individual serial killers at work. Over the previous decade the number stood at 156. [caption id="attachment_7419" align="alignright" width="120"] Howard Teten, the 'Father of Profiling'[/caption] What caused the spike? Were there that many more vicious and deranged predators roaming the country or did law enforcement become better able to identify those who killed over and over again? Two years earlier the FBI allowed a visionary special agent named Howard Teten to establish what would ultimately become the Behavioral Sciences Unit. Teten devised a groundbreaking analytic approach, now known as psychological criminal profiling, to try to identify unknown killers. His agents dedicated themselves to studying high-volume kill areas around the country and meticulously logged similarities between the cases. They analyzed the lifestyle, physical attributes and location of victims, the way the killers committed the murders and exactly how they left their victims. Patterns emerged. There was a swath of the county where pretty brunette co-eds were repeatedly reported missing. Some hospitals experienced an extraordinary number of unexplained deaths. Bodies were found with similar and unique wound patterns. Victims had been left in similar provocative positions. All similarities were put together like pieces of a big ugly puzzle. Agents began to know the “how” and “where” of multiple murders but not the “who.” Not yet. Although the exact date is unknown, this is the time the FBI began to use the term “serial killer” as opposed to the less precise “murder without motive” designation they used back then. My research also led to a startling revelation I never knew about. 1974 was the year in which some of America’s most notorious and prolific murderers began their reigns of bloody terror. [caption id="attachment_7420" align="alignleft" width="120"] Serial Killer Ted Bundy[/caption] Ted Bundy committed his first murder in January 1974. Dennis Radar (BTK-Bind-Torture-Kill) first murdered in January 1974. John Wayne Gacy killed the second of his 34 victims in January 1974. Coral Eugene Watts murdered the first of an estimated 90 victims in 1974. Paul John Knowles went on a killing spree, murdering 18 people in 1974. What was  it about 1974? [caption id="attachment_7425" align="alignright" width="128"] FBI Special Agent Jim Clemente[/caption] Retired FBI special agent Jim Clemente worked in the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit (the modern day name of Agent Teten’s original BSU) for 22 years. He told me, “At the time the BAU had no idea how devastating a year 1974 would turn out to be. Some of the most brilliant and prolific serial killers would launch their destructive careers at that time. But it would be decades before they were all brought to justice." [caption id="attachment_7421" align="alignleft" width="120"] Knowles, aka 'The Casanova Killer"[/caption] As FBI agents were building their multiple puzzles the elusive Bundy would murder upwards of 36 people over the next four years. Dennis Rader killed until 1991. Gacy wouldn’t be caught until late 1978. Watts continue his bloody spree for more than eight years. Thankfully, the handsome Knowles was on a rapid path of destruction. His murder binge ended after five months when a police officer shot him dead. Surely, there were news reports about some of these murders and missing people left behind in the frenzy of serial killing. But in 1974 the nation’s attention was scattered. Vietnam was still on-going. There was a frantic worldwide nuclear arms race underway. Watergate was toppling the administration of President Richard Nixon. Even though the daughter of multi-millionaire Randolph Hearst was kidnapped this year most Americans didn't notice that the nation’s crime rate was on the rise. [caption id="attachment_7426" align="alignright" width="120"] Kidnapped in 1974[/caption] But the FBI knew the murderous score and worried about creating public panic kept the information quiet. Also in 1974, the agents were well aware of a murderous maniac operating in San Francisco who signed taunting, cryptic letters to police with the moniker “Zodiac” and someone else was systematically picking up military men home on leave in Southern California and dumping their dismembered bodies along major highways. [caption id="attachment_7422" align="alignleft" width="120"] The FBI Led the Way in Profiling Serial Killers[/caption] The takeaway from this look back at history is that since that peak of serial killing madness in the ‘70s and ‘80s – (there were 603 serial killers identified in the 80’s) the numbers have decreased every single decade since. In the 90’s there were 498 serial killers, in the 2000’s there were 275. So far in this decade, there are just 67 active serial killers registered at the reliable Radford University site. It’s a testament to the perseverance of the FBI and to all law enforcement that studied and implemented Special Agent Teten’s revolutionary criminal profiling protocol. Serial killers may still hold a place of fascination for many of us but here’s hoping their number continues to dwindle. home  

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A Whistleblower’s Worst Nightmare

by Diane Dimond on March 24, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7400" align="alignleft" width="150"] Michael Winston - Still Paying the Price[/caption] Justice is supposed to be blind. But what happens when it turns out to be blind, deaf and dumb? Sadly, there is not enough space here to tell you the entire 7-year saga of whistleblower Michael Winston but the bottom line is this: He got royally screwed by the California judicial system. Winston, 62, is a mild-mannered Ph D. and a veteran leadership executive who has held top jobs at elite corporations like McDonnell Douglas, Motorola and Merrill Lynch. After taking time off to nurse his ailing parents Winston was recruited by Countrywide Financial to help polish their corporate image. He was quickly promoted - twice – and had a team of 200 employees. It’s almost unheard of for a top-tier executive turning whistleblower but that’s what Winston became after he noticed many of his staff were sickened by noxious air in their Simi Valley, California office. When the company failed to fix the problem Winston picked up the phone and called Cal-OSHA to investigate. Retaliation was immediate. Winston’s budget was cut and most of his staff was reassigned. [caption id="attachment_7404" align="alignright" width="150"] Countrywide's CEO, Angelo Mozilo[/caption] Several months later Winston says he refused Countrywide’s request to travel to New York and, basically, lie to the credit ratings agency Moody’s about corporate structure and practices. That was the death knell for Winston’s stellar 30-year-long career. When Countrywide was bought out by Bank of America in 2008 – following Countrywide’s widely reported lead role in the sub-prime mortgage fiasco that caused the collapse of the U.S. housing market – Winston was out of a job. In early 2011, after a month-long trial a jury overwhelmingly found that Winston had been wrongfully terminated and awarded him nearly $4 million. Lawyers for Bank of America (which had assumed all Countrywide liabilities) immediately asked the judge to overturn the verdict. Judge Bert Gennon Jr. denied the request saying, “There was a great deal of evidence that was provided to the jury in making their decision and they went about it very carefully.” Winston and his lawyer maintain they won despite repeated and egregious perjury by the opposition. Winston never saw a dime of his award and nearly two years later B of A appealed. In February 2013, the Court of Appeal issued a stunning reversal of the verdict. The court declared Winston had failed to make his case. [caption id="attachment_7405" align="alignleft" width="150"] Ca. Employment Attorney Cliff Palefsky[/caption] “This never happens…this isn’t legal,” Cliff Palefsky, a top employment lawyer in San Francisco told me during a phone conversation. “The appeals court is not supposed to go back and cherry-pick through the evidence the way this court did. And if there is any doubt about a case they are legally bound to uphold the jury’s verdict.” None of the legal eagles I spoke to could explain why the Court of Appeal would do such an apparently radical thing. The Government Accountability Project, a whistleblower protection group in D.C. has been watching the Winston case closely. Senior Counsel Richard Condit says he believes the appeal judge wrongly “nullified” the jury’s determination. “This case is vitally important,” Condit told me on the phone. “Seeing what happened to Winston, who will ever want to come forward and reveal what they know about corporate wrongdoings?” GAP and various legal academicians are trying to figure out a way to get Winston’s case before the U.S. Supreme Court. [caption id="attachment_7406" align="alignright" width="150"] B of A Assumed All Countrywide Liabilities[/caption] There have been whispers about the possible malpractice of Winston’s trial lawyer failing to file crucial documents that might have satisfied the appeal court’s questions. His appellate lawyer didn't even tell him when the appeals court was hearing the case and Winston was out of town. The LA District Attorney and the Sheriff’s Department refused to follow up on evidence that Countrywide witnesses, including founder Angelo Mozilo, had blatantly committed perjury on the stand. Some court watchers speak of the, “unholy alliance” between big corporations and the justice system in California. Winston, who says he spent $600,000 on legal fees, further depleted his savings by appealing to the California Supreme Court. That court refused to hear his case. During one of our many hours-long phone conversations Winston told me, “So, here I sit,” The whistleblower. The good guy loses. And the bad guys, officials at the corporation that cheated and lied and nearly caused the collapse of the U.S. economy -- wins.” [caption id="attachment_7408" align="alignleft" width="150"] Feds: Too Big to Fail, Too Big to Jail[/caption] There’s a lot of talk out of Washington these days about “economic equality.” But seven years have passed since the housing crisis and the feds have not prosecuted one key executive from any of the financial giants that helped fuel the economic crash. Too big to fail – and too big to jail, I guess. Bank of America has spent upwards of $50 billion in legal fees, litigation costs and fines cleaning up the Countrywide mess. Their latest projections indicate they’ll spend billions more before it’s over. To my mind a stiff prison sentence for the top-dogs who orchestrated the original mortgage schemes would go much further than agreeing that they pay hefty fines. That’s no deterrent to others since they all have lots of money. A recent e-mail I got from Michael Winston, a proud man who has been unemployed for four years, said: “I have just received (a) court order mandating that I pay to Bank of America over $100,000.00 for their court costs. This will be in all ways – financial, emotional, physical and spiritual – painful.” If a top-tier executive can’t prevail blowing the whistle on a corrupt company, if the feds fail to pursue prison terms, and if a jury’s verdict can be over-turned without the opportunity to appeal -- what kind of signal does that send to the dishonest? You know the answer. We’re telling them it is okay to put profit above everything else. We’re telling them to continue their illegal behaviors because there will be no prison time for them. At worst they may only have to part with a slice of their ill-gotten gains. This is not the way the justice system is supposed to work. home  

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Your Nose Could Save Your Life

by Diane Dimond on March 10, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7354" align="alignleft" width="150"] Learn the Smell of Geraniums![/caption] My dear Grandma Cora always grew geraniums - red geraniums, to be specific. Nearly every time I went to went to visit her she had pots of them flowering outside the front door. I would gently stroke the leaves and breathe in that unmistakable geranium smell. To this day I love the smell of geraniums so much I grow them myself - all year around. Now I discover that retaining the memory of that smell could help save lives. Same holds true for the smell of garlic, horseradish and other common odors. If suddenly detected in the wrong place at the wrong time it could signal that a chemical weapons attack is underway. Look, I’m not one of those doomsday planners, I figure when it’s my time to go then I’m ready to see what’s next. But after a conversation with a 30-year veteran of law enforcement named Rod Davis of First Responder Prep – a man who applies smell science to public safety – I came to realize how vulnerable we all are. [caption id="attachment_7355" align="alignright" width="150"] Universal Symbols for Chemical Weapons[/caption] Our world is full of chemical weapons. Some were manufactured as far back as World War I and still exist today. Newer arsenals have added to the total number and increased the possibility of mass murder. Syria, pressured by the United Nations, says it is currently in the process of getting rid of 1,200 tons of chemical weapons. We know there were all sorts of chemical weapons developed for use during the Iran/Iraq war in the 1980’s. In the early 1990’s our Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm troops discovered massive Iraqi chemical weapons stockpiles. North Korea is suspected of having a stockpile too. In this age of random and deadly terrorist attacks here in the U.S. what would stop a determined criminal from using a chemical weapon instead of a gun or a homemade bomb? [caption id="attachment_7364" align="alignleft" width="150"] Police Don't Always Have Access to Protective Gear[/caption] Law enforcement rushing to the scene would likely not have personal protective equipment with them – gas masks or rubber suits – and they would have to rely on all their training and their senses to keep themselves and the public safe. As Rod Davis puts it, “Science has proven that our sense of smell is the only sense directly hardwired to the brain.” So, this former police chief and commander of criminal investigations has come up with a set of of 8 x 10 reusable training cards embedded with a near permanent “rub-for-scent” component that helps emergency teams memorize the deadly smells. Teaching first responders those smells ahead of any attack, says Davis, could spell the difference between life and death. Davis’ patent-pending idea has already been marketed to police, fire and public safety offices nationwide. He says he has had interest from an unidentified Middle Eastern country that wants to use his scent technology expertise to train their military to use all their senses when responding to emergency situations. [caption id="attachment_7366" align="alignright" width="150"] Each Card Has Information and a Scent[/caption] Davis says he came up with his idea of a pack of carry-along cards a few years ago while attending an emergency response training session. “The instructor told us that many of the most common chemical weapons give off smells … like geraniums,” he told me on the phone from his home office in Mechanicsville, Virginia. “The officer next to me leaned over and whispered, ‘Gee, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a geranium let alone smelled one!” Davis researched the world’s stockpiles and came up with the top eight chemical weapons with distinctive odors. Those are the scents embedded in his training cards. For example, did you know that the lethal chemical Cyclo-sarin smells like peaches? It can cause seizures, paralysis, respiratory failure and death. [caption id="attachment_7357" align="alignleft" width="150"] Smell This in an Unlikely Spot - Take Care[/caption] The nerve agent Soman smells like Vapo-Rub or camphor. When it’s heated up it turns into a deadly gas. The same happens with another nerve agent called Tabun which has a decidedly fruity odor. Hydrogen Cyanide smells like almonds. It is so extremely toxic and immediately fatal to humans that it has been used in gas chamber executions. As the name indicates Hydrogen Sulfide smells like sulfur or rotten eggs. If exposed to high enough levels it can be immediately lethal. If you suddenly and inexplicably smell the odor of newly mowed hay you may be in the vicinity of a release of Phosgene which was used as a chemical weapon in both World War I and II. It still exists in the world, attacks the respiratory system and is fatal. The chemical Sulfur Mustard can smell like either garlic or onions. It doesn’t kill people but it incapacitates them almost immediately and results in the need for prolonged, intensive medical care. [caption id="attachment_7358" align="alignright" width="150"] A Common Smell That Could Signal Danger[/caption] And finally, the blister agent Lewisite. It is an extremely toxic arsenic-based liquid that attacks human tissue, eyes and the lungs and smells like Grandma Cora’s geraniums. Some readers are surely thinking, “Good grief, don’t put the idea of using a chemical weapon in some madman’s mind!” But, please, understand, many of those who hate America already have access to these agents. And if you think the distance between our country and theirs will prove to be a deterrent – I suggest you think again. We need to talk about this stuff. We need to be prepared to respond to all sorts of threats. And chemical based armaments are the most readily available and most often used weapon of mass destruction in the world. Training with scent technology just makes good sense. Are first responders in your area ready? home  

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Death For The Boston Bomb Suspect? Doubtful

by Diane Dimond on March 3, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7321" align="alignleft" width="135"] Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Mugshot[/caption] If I were a betting woman I’d plunk down $10 right now and bet that suspected Boston Marathon bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, will die in prison and not in an execution chamber. Yes, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder recently announced the feds will seek the death penalty for Tsarnaev, but chances are the 19-year-old may never face the possibility of being put to death by the U.S. government. Why do I say that? First, let’s review some facts. Tsarnaev and his older brother Tamerlan, 26, are accused of planting powerful bombs at the Boston Marathon’s finish line, causing the deaths of three people and the wounding of more than 260 others. [caption id="attachment_7340" align="alignright" width="150"] The Bombs Unleashed Hell in the Streets[/caption] One of the dead was a police officer who was shot and killed during the ensuing manhunt for the brothers. The older Tsarnaev was shot four days later during a final street confrontation with police. His death was hastened according to the official indictment after his wounded little brother ran over him while fleeing the scene in a stolen car. Young Dzhokhar was found the next day hiding in a covered boat in the residential neighborhood of Watertown, Massachusetts, not far [caption id="attachment_7323" align="alignleft" width="150"] Dzhokar At Moment of Capture[/caption] from the bombing site. Inside the boat he had scrawled a handwritten message saying in part, “The U.S. Government is killing our innocent civilians. I can’t stand to see such evil go unpunished… We Muslims are one body, you hurt one you hurt us all.” The message ends with the confessional line, “Stop killing our innocent people and we will stop.” As the evidence against the surviving brother has mounted -- and been widely reported -- it doesn’t seem that any jury would ever find him not guilty. But history shows Dzhokhar Tsarnaev might never face a jury. According to the Federal Death Penalty Resource Counsel in almost half of federal death penalty cases over the last 25 years prosecutors ultimately withdrew the threat of death before trial.  Instead, they agreed to plea agreements that resulted in life in prison with no possibility of early release. [caption id="attachment_7333" align="alignright" width="150"] Last to be Executed by Feds: Timothy McVeigh[/caption] Further, since the federal death sentence was re-instated in 1988 seventy defendants have been sentenced to the death chamber but only three have actually been executed: Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in June 2001, Juan Raul Garza eight days later and in March 2003, Louis Jones Jr. received a lethal injection courtesy of Uncle Sam. (For the record, the three convicted murderers were – in chronological order – White, Hispanic and Black.) But let’s say prosecutors stick to their guns on the Boston bombing case, refuse to offer Tsarnaev a plea bargain and he actually goes on trial. I’m still not convinced he will get the death penalty. Tsarnaev’s lead defense lawyer is none other than Judy Clarke who has been called, “A master strategist in death penalty cases” and one who has an unmatched track record of humanizing high-profile murder clients and keeping them off death row. [caption id="attachment_7334" align="alignleft" width="150"] "Master Strategist" Attorney Judy Clarke[/caption] Among those for whom Clarke has life sentences instead of a date with the executioner: The Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski; the Atlanta Olympics bomber, Eric Rudolph; A September 11th co-conspirator, Zacarias Moussaoui and the young man who shot Arizona Congresswoman Gabby Giffords and killed six others, Jared Loughner. Jurors don’t relish condemning to death defendants who were teenagers at the time of their crime because everyone knows teens often do stupid, impulsive things. Attorney Clark is sure to use both Tsarnaev’s young age (he turned 20 in custody) and his culturally different and turbulent upbringing to appeal for mercy. The Tsarnaev family emigrated from Russia in 2002. Dzhokhar is the youngest of four children born to a patriarchal and religious family whose Muslim faith considers elders to be important authority figures that are followed without question. [caption id="attachment_7335" align="alignright" width="150"] The Late Tamerlan Tsarnaev[/caption] Using one of the oldest tricks in a criminal defense attorney’s briefcase Ms. Clarke will likely play on jurors sympathy by emphasizing that Dzhokhar’s actions were heavily influenced by his fractured family and his controlling, more radicalized older brother. She will probably stress how Dzhokhar felt abandoned after being left, virtually alone, in the wake of his parent’s divorce. Both his father and mother moved back to Russia. The only one he had left to rely on was his older brother. Sob stories like these have actually been known to work when it comes time to sentence a defendant. Another reason I doubt this young man will be condemned to execution has to do with the current public perception of capital punishment. Nationally, the latest Gallup poll indicates, that public support for the death penalty continues to decline. Only about 60 percent of Americans support the idea these days. But in the state of Massachusetts -- where any Tsarnaev trial is likely to be held -- a Boston Globe poll conducted statewide last fall revealed only 33 percent of citizens wanted Tsarnaev to get the death penalty. 57 percent said he should be sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole. It is a fact that federal prosecutors don’t like to bring cases to court that aren't a slam-dunk win. Another fact: it will be difficult to seat a death-penalty qualified jury in a state like Massachusetts. Once a potential juror says they cannot vote for capital punishment they are disqualified. [caption id="attachment_7336" align="alignleft" width="150"] Boston AG Carmen Ortiz's Team to Prosecute[/caption] Look, I may be all wet. The marathon attack was the most significant anti-American terrorist act on American soil since the tragedy on September 11th, a fact that is hard to dismiss. If there is a trial and if it is actually held in Boston and not moved to another jurisdiction, disfigured victims of the bombing may attend the proceedings to show the jury, first-hand, the damage done to them. The anti-death penalty trend of the past decade may snap at that point and Tsarnaev may, indeed, face the executioner’s needle. But as I said at the outset, if I were a gambler I wouldn't bet on it. home

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BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION

by Diane Dimond on February 24, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7302" align="alignleft" width="150"] BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION, PTSD - Homegrown Cases on the Rise[/caption]

Think about the least desirable neighborhoods around you. You know the places I’m talking about – the areas you think twice about going to in the daytime and deliberately avoid at night. STENDRA dosage, Those zones where police officers are most often called to respond to reports of shootings, stabbings and murders.

Now, online buy STENDRA without a prescription, think about the people who live in those crime infested neighborhoods. STENDRA from canada, Think of the young people who grow up watching the violence all around them and fearing it will come for them.

A recent article by journalists at ProPublica.org quoted a growing list of studies that have compared what happens to people who live in dangerous neighborhoods here at home with what happens to soldiers serving in war zones, BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION. The unanimous conclusion is that residents of violent neighborhoods can suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder just as so many of our soldiers do. Just like veterans, STENDRA online cod, civilians can experience flashbacks, Where to buy STENDRA, nightmares, paranoia, and social withdrawal, where can i cheapest STENDRA online.

While the military has established protocols for diagnosing PTSD in soldiers there are barely any programs in place to help civilians. Purchase STENDRA online, You can count on one hand the number of hospital emergency rooms that bother to question victims of community violence, those who come in seeking treatment for a stabbing or gunshot wound.

[caption id="attachment_7304" align="alignright" width="150"] Sometimes the War Zones Are Here at Home[/caption]

We know from research on military personnel BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION, that PTSD is a very real, very terrifying syndrome in which the sufferer has a sudden and distorted sense of being in imminent and extreme danger. They become horrified, STENDRA from canadian pharmacy, hyper-aggressive and violent in response. Taking STENDRA, The gather weapons to help them fight off their perceived threats.

If these recent studies about the growing number of civilian PTSD cases are on target – (one from Drexel University, for example, where can i order STENDRA without prescription, found homegrown PTSD victims are more likely to carry a weapon in order to “restore feelings of safety”) -- doesn’t it behoove us to pay closer attention to neighborhoods that could be producing human ticking time bombs. Buy cheap STENDRA no rx, It doesn’t take a risk assessment expert to peg this problem as a solid public safety issue.

After a catastrophic event like the 9-11 attacks, the Oklahoma City bombing or a devastating hurricane mental health experts flood in to offer counselling and follow up treatment, BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION. Currently, however, STENDRA samples, only one U.S. STENDRA used for, hospital performs routine PTSD screening.

[caption id="attachment_7305" align="alignleft" width="150"] Investigates Civilian PTSD Cases[/caption]

ProPublica contacted top trauma centers in the 21 U.S. cities with the highest murder rates, my STENDRA experience. BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION, Only the Spirit of Charity Hospital in New Orleans has their emergency room doctors routinely monitor for PTSD and offer treatment options to the incoming wounded.

At Cook County Hospital in Chicago’s inner city a pilot program began in 2011 to identify PTSD symptoms in pediatric patients. What is STENDRA, Now, social workers report 42 percent of all patients examined for gunshots, stabbings and other violent injuries had signs of PTSD symptoms, order STENDRA no prescription. Most of them were male but, Discount STENDRA, when questioned, women and whole families reported “significant levels of PTSD.”

Researchers in Atlanta questioned 8,000 inner-city dwellers and learned that two-thirds had been violently attacked, cheap STENDRA, about half of them knew someone who had been murdered and 1 person out of every 3 interviewed reported having had PTSD symptoms sometime in their lives. Purchase STENDRA online no prescription, “The rates of PTSD we see are as high or higher than Iraq, Afghanistan or Vietnam veterans,” Project leader Dr, is STENDRA addictive. Kerry Ressler said, BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION. "We have a whole population who is traumatized.”

[caption id="attachment_7306" align="alignright" width="150"] Studies: Community Violence = PTSD[/caption]

ProPublica reports that at Detroit’s Receiving Hospital psychologists talk with susceptible patients about PTSD but there’s no real program in place. Australia, uk, us, usa, Staffs at hospital trauma units in Birmingham, Alabama and St. Louis, STENDRA treatment, Missouri say they hope to begin routine PTSD screening by the end of the year. Low dose STENDRA, And, doctors in Baltimore, Newark, doses STENDRA work, Memphis and Jackson, STENDRA mg, Mississippi all said they would like to have such a program but their hospitals simply don’t have the money. BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION, The bills of low income patients are most often paid by Medicaid which doesn’t cover PTSD screenings. Maybe the program should reconsider as a bit of public money spent now could save a lot more in the future.

Regular readers of this column know the rate of crime has been going down, STENDRA interactions, nationally, Buy no prescription STENDRA online, but still there are pockets in America where rates of violent crime continue to escalate.

There are whole neighborhoods in the United States that are so dangerous they are, literally, STENDRA pictures, creating a clinically definable group of people who could violently lash out at any given moment. STENDRA blogs, Think of the damage done in terms of getting an education, family relationships, parenting skills, STENDRA trusted pharmacy reviews, and, in many cases, the frequent inability of adult PTSD victims to hold down a job. You know who pays for their unemployment benefits. We all do, BUY STENDRA NO PRESCRIPTION. We also pay for food stamps, child welfare, housing allowances, the cost of family and juvenile court and incarceration costs.

[caption id="attachment_7308" align="alignleft" width="150"] PTSD in Inner-City Children is on the Rise[/caption]

There are so many politicians who, during election cycles, wax eloquently about working for the well-being of all citizens, doing what’s best for the economy and society at large. Funny, I don’t hear many speak about crime, justice or concrete ideas to make us safer where we live.

I guess it comes down to this: Do we want to offer better policing, meaningful counselling and maybe even a relocation stipend to those who have endured violent acts in their own communities – or do we want to wait until something awful happens and pay the increased freight on the back end.

There’s no getting around it. Researchers have been studying this problem since the late 90’s and all have come to the same conclusion. There are parts of America that are as damaging to human beings as the worst foreign war zones.

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STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER

by Diane Dimond on February 17, 2014

[caption id="attachment_7285" align="alignleft" width="150"] STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER, Ken Landwehr circa 1978[/caption]

This is a story about a cop’s cop. A hometown kid who devoted his life to keeping his community safe, STENDRA over the counter, a man who took on the duty no one should have to do – to minister to the murdered and help seek justice for their families.

This column is dedicated to the late Lt. Ken Landwehr, order STENDRA from mexican pharmacy, Commander of the homicide unit of the Wichita, STENDRA cost, Kansas Police Department because he epitomizes the determination, integrity and ingenuity that all great detectives possess. His deeds will live on in the annuals of America’s crime and justice history, STENDRA duration.

Landwehr was the son of an aircraft worker and a homemaker, STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER. He was an Eagle Scout as a boy and devoured books about the investigations of the legendary Sherlock Holmes. STENDRA brand name, He attended Bishop Carroll Catholic High School where he played tricks on the nuns and was no stranger to occasional bouts of brawling and drinking.

At Wichita State University he was, by his own admission, get STENDRA, a mediocre student. STENDRA forum, He thought about joining the FBI but was unsure about his life’s path – until a fateful day in 1977 when he went to his job at a north Wichita clothing store.

[caption id="attachment_7289" align="alignright" width="150"] STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER, He Wanted Homicide to Help Victims[/caption]

Robbers burst in and hogtied Landwehr, the owner and several customers. As the young college student lay hogtied on the floor he heard one of the robbers jack a bullet into the barrel of a handgun as he stood over him. Landwehr felt sure he was about to die, STENDRA street price. Everyone escaped unharmed that day and that life changing experience infused him with a deep empathy for victims and gave him a razor-sharp focus for his future. STENDRA alternatives, Landwehr joined the Wichita PD the next year and at the entrance interview the rookie officer was asked how far he wanted to go in the department. “I said, ‘I want to command homicide,’” Lieutenant Landwehr told a television reporter years later, STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER. “Those victims cannot speak for themselves, so that’s probably the only reason why I picked homicide.”

His dream would come true but not before he paid his dues by working in patrol, STENDRA australia, uk, us, usa, vice, STENDRA steet value, narcotics, cold cases and, finally, STENDRA no prescription, in 1987, Cheap STENDRA no rx, he made detective in the homicide unit. There, he worked tirelessly, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, taking each murder case personally. No prescription STENDRA online, Over the years Landwehr had a hand in working – and mostly solving – some 600 murder investigations. His wife, Cindy, is STENDRA safe, says he felt deeply about each and every case.

His most famous case began in the mid-1980’s when Wichita’s police chief assigned the impressive young detective to a special task force called “Ghostbusters.” The goal: to learn the identity of a serial killer who had murdered nine people and signed his taunting notes to local reporters with the moniker BTK (short for bind-torture-kill.)

[caption id="attachment_7287" align="alignleft" width="150"] STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER, Landwehr (R) Worked Some 600 Homicides[/caption]

The investigation would span two decades until it finally went cold. Order STENDRA online overnight delivery no prescription, There was one more BTK murder in January, 1991 but then the brutality stopped. Many thought the killer must have died, fast shipping STENDRA. Landwehr, Buy STENDRA from mexico, who was promoted to Commander of Homicide in 1992, always kept his BTK files handy, firmly believing his department would ultimately solve the case, STENDRA reviews.

He was right. Landwehr was at his wife’s bedside in March 2004 as she was being prepped for gall bladder surgery when word came that BTK had suddenly resurfaced, STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER. Online STENDRA without a prescription, After being dormant for all those years, a letter bearing the familiar BTK handwriting had been sent to the local newspaper. The author had included Polaroid photos of a BTK kill to prove his identity, STENDRA canada, mexico, india.

More communications followed and Landwehr devised a strategy to play to the killer’s ego to keep him engaged. Effects of STENDRA, The detective staged a number of news conferences about the investigation knowing the attention would appeal to the killer’s vanity.

[caption id="attachment_7288" align="alignright" width="150"] STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER, A 30 Year Investigation Complete - Landwehr Announces BTK's Arrest[/caption]

The pair began private communications via cryptic newspaper ads in a cat-and-mouse game in which Landwehr could feel the noose tightening. When BTK asked if he could be traced if he sent a floppy disc of information to Landwehr, the detective told him it was safe to send it, buy STENDRA from canada. It was not. STENDRA for sale, Shortly after police got their hands on the disc – delivered to a local TV station – they discovered it had been created on a computer at the Christ Lutheran Church in Wichita by someone named Dennis. Dennis Rader was president of the church council.

When they first came face-to-face in an interrogation room Rader reportedly confronted the commander about the trickery, STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER.

“How come you lied to me?”

Lt, STENDRA used for. Landwehr calmly replied, Where can i buy cheapest STENDRA online, “Because I was trying to catch you.”

[caption id="attachment_7290" align="alignleft" width="135"] Landwehr (R) Interrogates BTK[/caption]

Landwehr had been prescient enough to save a very small DNA sample recovered in 1974 from the first murder scene. That DNA was matched to Rader who confessed to all ten murders.

Landwehr was diagnosed with advanced kidney cancer just before his 2012 retirement, STENDRA online cod. STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER, He died last month at age 59. I write about him because he was a bigger man than just the BTK case. Canada, mexico, india, After his death, colleagues told touching stories of how the gruff and “sometimes blunt and cantankerous” raspy-voiced Landwehr responded to victims.

He once quietly took a victimized boy aside and described “the beauty of heaven” to the child to help soothe his trauma, what is STENDRA.

When speaking to families of murder victims he always talked about when – not if – the killer would be caught.

[caption id="attachment_7291" align="alignright" width="150"] A Last Salute to an Admired Cop[/caption]

At the emergency room bedside of a five-year-old drowning victim a detective was brought to tears when Lt, STENDRA OVER THE COUNTER. Landwehr suddenly appeared to lay a comforting hand on the child and whisper something in the little dead boy’s ear.

He then turned to the detective and said, “Touch him. You've got to touch him.”

It was a lesson from a veteran homicide detective that a dead body deserves kindness, dignity and justice.

It also signaled how much of himself Ken Landwehr gave to his job over the nearly 35 years he served. That compassion and doggedness-to-duty is why the mayor dubbed Landwehr, “The Dick Tracy of Wichita.”

We should all be so lucky to have such a dedicated detective on our local force. Maybe you do.

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BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION

by Diane Dimond on February 10, 2014

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Heroin is back – with a vengeance, LASIX samples. Where can i find LASIX online, It never really disappeared from the drug-culture landscape, of course, LASIX class, LASIX coupon, but its popularity center has definitely widened these days. It’s no longer the drug of choice for only the down-and-out habitual street druggie, buy LASIX without prescription. LASIX forum, Today, heroin has become a favorite of many middle and upper-class folks who have lost their way in the search to find pain relief, LASIX over the counter.

This is not a column about the tragic recent passing of acclaimed actor Phillip Seymour Hoffman, 46, who was found dead in his New York apartment, reportedly, surrounded by as many as 70 glassine bags of heroin, BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION. Purchase LASIX, Nor last year’s passing of the popular star of the TV show “Glee”, Corey Montieth, LASIX gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release, No prescription LASIX online, 31, who succumbed to a heroin overdose in a Vancouver hotel room, online buying LASIX. LASIX blogs, Those celebrity stories make for a lot of headlines but the much bigger story is about the rest of us. There are hundreds of thousands of Americans who currently snort or inject into their veins one of the most unpredictable and deadly drugs known to man, doses LASIX work. LASIX photos, That should be of concern to all of us.

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So many Americans got hooked on so many different kinds of prescription painkilling drugs over the last decade – opiates like OxyContin or Vicodin – that new federal laws tightening access to them were passed, prices soared and it became cheaper for addicts to buy a ten dollar bag of heroin.

Most frightening, low dose LASIX. LASIX schedule, According to drug abuse experts an astonishing number of young people – those who romanticized the high they experienced after raiding their parent’s medicine cabinet – have also turned to heroin.

The latest National Survey on Drug Use and Health reports that heroin use in the U.S, purchase LASIX for sale. LASIX description, has nearly doubled in the last ten years. Some 156,000 Americans aged 12 or older admitted they first tried heroin in 2012, BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION. (That is not a misprint, buy LASIX no prescription. Buy LASIX online no prescription, Yes, 12-year-old children are using heroin.) This is a fraction of the total number of illicit drug abusers in this country but here’s the saddest part: Today’s heroin is killing people at an alarming rate, buying LASIX online over the counter. LASIX cost, In Naperville, Illinois – an affluent suburb near Chicago’s heroin riddled West Side – nearly 20 high school students have died of heroin overdoses in the last six years, LASIX dosage. Order LASIX online c.o.d, CNN showcased a young woman from Naperville named Gabby Muro. BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION, Hooked on heroin at 15, Gabby was arrested for possession and spent two years in prison. She believes her time behind bars saved her life, where can i order LASIX without prescription. Buy LASIX from mexico, Gabby’s take on what lures kids from her upper-middle class neighborhood to use heroin.

[caption id="attachment_7268" align="alignleft" width="120"] Gabby Muro Mug Shot[/caption]

“Their parents just hand them all this money, LASIX dose, Taking LASIX, ” she said. “They don’t even ask, buy generic LASIX, Order LASIX no prescription, like, ‘What are you going to do. Where are you going?’ They do whatever they want.”

Kids in-the-know in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania could visit a local McDonald’s to get heroin, BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION. Police say employee Shania Dennis, 26, instructed buyers to go to the drive-up window and say, “I’d like to order a toy.” That code got them a Happy Meal box with heroin packets inside. Earlier this year, another McDonald’s employee in Murrysville, Pa. was also arrested for selling heroin.

A federal agent who runs major heroin trafficking investigations recently told ABC News, “Heroin is exploding nationwide. BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION, It’s making a huge comeback. People are dropping like flies." Part of the reason is that addicts have no way of knowing the potency of the heroin they buy – or what might have been added to it.

Law enforcement reports that heroin laced with fentanyl – a powerful painkiller given to terminal cancer patients – has been cropping up at overdose death scenes in the Northeast at a frightening rate. Since purveyors of this poison often exchange trade secrets officials worry this tainted type of heroin could now appear nationwide.

[caption id="attachment_7269" align="alignright" width="150"] Glassine Bags Like These Found at Hoffman's[/caption]

Packets stamped with the words “Thera-flu” or “Bud Ice” are thought to have caused the recent deaths of more than 20 people in western Pennsylvania, 22 heroin related deaths in Rhode Island and as many as 37 in Maryland since September. State Police in Massachusetts recently confiscated more than 1,200 packets of heroin with the words “ObamaCare” and “Kurt Cobain” stamped on the bags, BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION.

The governor of Vermont devoted his entire State of the State speech last month to what he called the “full blown” heroin and opiate crisis there. Governor Peter Shumlin literally begged the legislature for more money for treatment programs noting that it costs Vermont $1,120 a week to keep an addict in prison while a week’s worth of treatment at a state-run center costs $123. Nearly 80% of Vermont’s prisoners are serving time on drug charges.

"The time has come for us to stop quietly averting our eyes from the growing heroin addiction in our front yards," Shumlin said, “while we fear and fight treatment facilities in our backyards."

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For those readers who think this topic doesn’t touch their life – I implore you to think again. BUY LASIX NO PRESCRIPTION, A heroin high now costs less than a decent bottle of wine, a movie ticket or a meal for two at a fast food joint. Functioning heroin addicts are all around us yet, realize, they are one tainted glassine bag away from a melt-down – or death. They drive next to us on the highways, work in our hospitals or teach in our schools. Those who have been arrested and incarcerated went through the tax-payer funded justice system and are sitting in prisons paid for with your tax dollars.

The heroin epidemic affects you. It affects all of us. And it’s only getting worse.

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