May 2016

The Great Bathroom Debate

The Great Bathroom Debate – How Does it End?

This too shall pass from the headlines in time, but while the issue of who-can-legally-use-what-public-bathroom is still red hot here are some thoughts.

We are a nation of almost 320 million people. Statistics are not plentiful. There are no national figures kept but it’s estimated the number of transgendered Americans is about 700,000 or 0.3% of the population.

Since the biggest controversy these days seems focused on transgender students and what might happen in their school bathrooms or locker rooms perhaps the best statistic to focus upon comes from a 2014 survey of millennials by the Public Religion Research Institute. That survey found 1% of young people identify as transgender.  [click to continue…]

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He Should Have Been Deported - Then He Murdered

He Should Have Been Deported – Then He Murdered a Woman

Decisions always have a consequence. That’s what I told my daughter as she was growing up. Make a decision to do something but, realize, you must then live with the consequences. I’m left wondering if Washington politicians had mothers who taught them the same lesson.

The consequence of Washington’s long-term failure to fix our fractured immigration policy just keeps getting more dangerous. The upshot for the rest of us? Ticking human time bombs walking among us.

For more than three years the Department of Homeland Security’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement division (ICE) has been forced to release thousands of deportation-ready criminal immigrants out on to American streets. More than 86,000 of them are, presumably, still out there. [click to continue…]

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Headline Writers Call - or the Reporter's

Headline Writers Call – or the Reporter’s

A federal prosecutor friend wrote me recently and attached a news article with the headline, “Decision Time for FBI on Clinton.”

“Why does the media say stuff like this?” he asked.  “The FBI has no say in this or any investigation.” And he went on to muse about how reporters just don’t seem to understand that the only entity that can make a “decision” on whether to indict Hillary Clinton for the way she (mis)handled her State Department e-mails is the office of the U.S. Attorney General.

He’s right. The the final decision is up to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch. With that said, I figure it is time to talk about the elephant in the room. Elephant, is thy name partisan politics? [click to continue…]

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Betty Winstanley with children, Liz (L) and David (R) Fighting to Move Mom Closer

Betty Winstanley with children, Liz (L) and David (R) Fighting to Move Mom Closer

Would you hire someone to manage your personal affairs and finances who charged $50,599.18 in just three months?

What if they charged $1560.00 to make two phone calls to your son to discuss, “Dates for (a) Christmas” visit with you. Or if you got a bill for more than $1,000 from this person explaining, it was because their, “Computer emails appear(ed) to be breached …(and) extensive work (was) done on my phone and computer as a result.” They charged you for calls to their IT department and to an attorney they consulted.

And what if this same person refused to communicate with two of your three children even when you were rushed to the hospital? And when they placed a couple of phone calls 3 days later to see how you were doing you were charged another $990.00?

Is there any part of this that sounds reasonable? [click to continue…]

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Judicial Compassion Can Save a Life

by Diane Dimond on May 8, 2016

Sgt. Joe Serna -- A Judge Turned His Life Around

Sgt. Joseph Serna — A Judge Turned His Life Around

The former Special Forces Sergeant stood before the Veteran’s Treatment Court judge – as he had every two weeks since being charged with driving under the influence a year earlier — and admitted he had lied. His urinalysis test had come back positive but Sergeant Joe Serna had originally denied it.

Serna had been fighting internal demons ever since coming home after four bloody combat tours of Afghanistan and serving almost two decades in the military. Serna was almost killed  least three times. Once when his team crossed paths with a suicide bomber, another when they were hit by a roadside bomb. But at this moment, something inside the Green Beret soldier made him ‘fess up to breaking his parole. Being stateside again had been both wonderful and a trigger for a severe case of post-traumatic stress. [click to continue…]

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